Architecture in Translation: Germany, Turkey, and the Modern House

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Duke University Press, Jul 12, 2012 - Architecture - 392 pages
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In Architecture in Translation, Esra Akcan offers a way to understand the global circulation of culture that extends the notion of translation beyond language to visual fields. She shows how members of the ruling Kemalist elite in Turkey further aligned themselves with Europe by choosing German-speaking architects to oversee much of the design of modern cities. Focusing on the period from the 1920s through the 1950s, Akcan traces the geographical circulation of modern residential models, including the garden city—which emphasized green spaces separating low-density neighborhoods of houses surrounded by gardens—and mass housing built first for the working-class residents in industrial cities and, later, more broadly for mixed-income residents. She shows how the concept of translation—the process of change that occurs with transportation of people, ideas, technology, information, and images from one or more countries to another—allows for consideration of the sociopolitical context and agency of all parties in cultural exchanges. Moving beyond the indistinct concepts of hybrid and transculturation and avoiding passive metaphors such as import, influence, or transfer, translation offers a new approach relevant to many disciplines. Akcan advocates a commitment to a new culture of translatability from below for a truly cosmopolitan ethics in a globalizing world.
 

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Contents

Modernity in Translation
1
A Conviction about Its Own Translatability
27
2 Melancholy in Translation
101
3 Siedlung in Subaltern Exile
145
4 Convictions About Untranslatability
215
5 Toward a Cosmopolitan Architecture
247
Epilogue
283
Notes
291
Bibliography
337
Sources of Illustration
375
Index
383
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About the author (2012)

Esra Akcan is Assistant Professor of Art History at the University of Illinois, Chicago. She is the author of (Land)Fill Istanbul: Twelve Scenarios for a Global City.

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