Archives internationales d'ethnographie

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P.W.M. Trap, 1896 - Archaeology
 

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Page 222 - All that remains of the once populous pueblo of Sia is a small group of houses and a mere handful of people in the midst of one of the most extensive ruins of the Southwest, the living relic of an almost extinct people and a pathetic tale of the ravages of warfare and pestilence. This picture is even more touching than the infant's cradle or the tiny sandal found buried in the cliff in the canyon walls.
Page 57 - Over de Opschriften uit Koetei in Verband met de Geschiedenis van het Schrift in den indischen Archipel.
Page 251 - Report upon the Condition and Progress of the US National Museum during the year ending June 30, 1896.
Page 99 - KOREAN GAMES: WITH NOTES ON THE CORRESPONDING GAMES OF CHINA AND JAPAN, Stewart Culin.
Page 222 - Southwest (PI. i) the living relic of an almost extinct people and a pathetic tale of the ravages of warfare and pestilence. This picture is even more touching than the infant's cradle or the tiny sandal found buried in the cliff in the canyon walls. The Sia of to-day is in much the same condition as that of the ancient cave and cliff dweller as we restore their villages in imagination.
Page 16 - Kuckuck (gugüeka oder gugiitka) sei ein Frauenzimmer gewesen, das einen einzigen Sohn gehabt, der Giigo (Georg) geheissen und früh verstorben sei. Ihr Gram und Kummer um ihn war grenzenlos, und vor gewaltigem Leid ging sie morgens und abends aufs Grab und weinte und klagte. Ihres endlosen Gejammers wurde Gott überdrüssig und eines Morgens kam Gott hin zu ihr und fragte sie: „Was plärrst du da und kuckst da, du närrisches Weibchen, immer und ohne Untorlass auf dem Grabe?" -- „So lang ich...
Page 61 - The characters on the dagger (Fig. 3) are decidedly letters of Indian origin, and, if read from left to right, look like ~ | maya ma \ ya \ ma \ ma \ mama \ ma \ ya \ ma \ . No meaning, unless a cabbalistic one, can be attached to this repetition of two letters.
Page 58 - The envoys presented a letter from the king. This was written on what looked like the very thin bark of a tree ; it was glossy, slightly green, several feet long, and somewhat broader than one inch ; the characters in which it was written were small, and had to be read horizontally.
Page 60 - May.) Mr. Hatton states that Muruts, who had been on bold or risky expeditions, used to tatu and he mentions a case where a Murut, having run away from the enemy, was tatued on his back. (Hatton's Diary, 6th April.) So that we may justly conclude that tatuing among the natives of Borneo is one method of writing.
Page 206 - ¡uggests that the observation of a spider's web may have given rise to the art of netting. It is of interest to note that the following citation is found in a Chinese cyclopaedia : " Vuen-kien Luihan"(i7oi, torn, ccccxlix. art. " Chi-chu," 2): — " In ' Paupuh-tsze' it is said, ' Tai-hau [or Pâo-hsî] made a spider his master and knitted nets.

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