Aristotle on False Reasoning: Language and the World in the Sophistical Refutations

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SUNY Press, Feb 27, 2003 - Philosophy - 248 pages
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Presenting the first book-length study in English of Aristotle’s Sophistical Refutations, this work takes a fresh look at this seminal text on false reasoning. Through a careful and critical analysis of Aristotle’s examples of sophistical reasoning, Scott G. Schreiber explores Aristotle’s rationale for his taxonomy of twelve fallacy types. Contrary to certain modern attempts to reduce all fallacious reasoning to either errors of logical form or linguistic imprecision, Aristotle insists that, as important as form and language are, certain types of false reasoning derive their persuasiveness from mistaken beliefs about the nature of language and the nature of the world.
 

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Contents

Reasoning and the Sophistical Refutations
1
Fallacies Due to Language
9
Conclusion
18
Form of the Expression
37
Aristotle and Protagoras
48
Composition Division and Accent
55
Conclusion
74
Begging the Question and NonCause As Cause
97
Conclusion
139
Many Questions
153
Conclusion and Summary
167
Paralogisms in Aristotle
173
Aristode on Kupiov Predication
179
Platonic and Academic
187
Bibliography
233
Index of Names
241

Accident and Consequent
113
Historical Reasons for Treating Fallacies Due
128

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About the author (2003)

Scott G. Schreiber is Assistant Professor of Philosophy and Director of Classical Studies at St. Norbert College.

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