Aristotle's De Motu Animalium: Text with Translation, Commentary, and Interpretive Essays

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Princeton University Press, 1985 - Philosophy - 430 pages
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Available for the first time in paperback, this volume contains text with translation of De Motu Animalium, Aristotle's attempt to lay the groundwork for a general theory of the explanation of animal activity, along with commentary and interpretive essays on the work.

 

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Contents

The Authorship and Dating of the De Mont
3
The Manuscripts
13
Note on the Translation
20
Translation 24
41
Aristotle on Teleological Explanation
59
Teleology and Intentionality
85
Teleology and the Universe
93
The Function of Man
100
Phantasia and orexis
261
Chapter 1
273
Chapter 2
286
Chapter 3
292
Chapter 4
311
Chapter 5
325
Chapter 6
331
Chapter 7
341

The DC Motn Anhualhnn and Aristotles Scien
107
The MA and Physics VIII
114
Animal Motion and Heavenly Motion
121
The Suinphuton Pnewua and the DC Motu
143
The Role of Phantasia in Aristotles Explana
221
Phantasia in the accounts of action
232
The use and range of phantasia
241
Phantasia and aisthesis
255
Chapter 8
353
Chapter 9
369
Chapter 11
379
BIBLIOGRAPHY
387
INDEX
401
OCORUM
412
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About the author (1985)

Aristotle, 384 B.C. - 322 B. C. Aristotle was born at Stagira, in Macedonia, in 384 B.C. At the age of 17, he went to Athens to study at Plato's Academy, where he remained for about 20 years, as a student and then as a teacher. When Plato died in 347 B.C., Aristotle moved to Assos, a city in Asia Minor, where a friend of his, Hermias, was ruler. After Hermias was captured and executed by the Persians in 345 B.C., Aristotle went to Pella, the Macedonian capital, where he became the tutor of the king's young son Alexander, later known as Alexander the Great. In 335, when Alexander became king, Aristotle returned to Athens and established his own school, the Lyceum Aristotle's works were lost in the West after the decline of Rome, but during the 9th Century A.D., Arab scholars introduced Aristotle, in Arabic translation, to the Islamic world. In the 13th Century, the Latin West renewed its interest in Aristotle's work, and Saint Thomas Aquinas found in it a philosophical foundation for Christian thought. The influence of Aristotle's philosophy has been pervasive; it has even helped to shape modern language and common sense. Aristotle died in 322 B.C.

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