Aristotle's two systems

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Oxford University Press, Incorporated, 1987 - Philosophy - 359 pages
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Each of the two major approaches to Aristotle--the unitarian, which understands his work as forming a single, unified system, and the developmentalist, which seeks a sequence of developing ideas--has inherent limitations. This book proposes a synthetic view of Aristotle that sees development as a change between systematic theories. Setting theories of the so-called logical works beside theories of the physical and metaphysical treatises, Graham shows that Aristotle's doctrines fall into two distinct systems of philosophies that are genetically related. This study--the first major alternative to the unitarian approach since Jaeger pioneered the developmentalist method in 1923--provides a sweeping reappraisal of Aristotle's science and metaphysics and a new approach to the problem of substance presented in the Metaphysics.

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Contents

Atomic Substantialism
20
Hylomorphic Substantialism
57
The Incommensurability of the Systems
84
Copyright

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About the author (1987)

Daniel W. Graham is A. O. Smoot Professor of Philosophy at Brigham Young University. He is the author of Aristotle's Two Systems (1987); editor of the collected papers on ancient philosophy of Gregory Vlastos, Studies in Greek Philosophy (2 vols., 1995); translator-commentator of Aristotle: Physics, Book VIII (1999); co-editor with Victor Caston of a Festschrift for his mentor: Presocratic Philosophy: Essays in Honour of Alexander Mourelatos (2002); author of Explaining the Cosmos: the Ionian Tradition of Scientific Philosophy (2006); and co-editor with Patricia Curd of The Oxford Handbook of Presocratic Philosophy (2008).

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