Arktos: The Polar Myth in Science, Symbolism, and Nazi Survival

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Adventures Unlimited Press, 1996 - Family & Relationships - 260 pages
A scholarly treatment of catastrophes, ancient myths and Nazi Occult beliefs. Explored are the many tales of an ancient race said to have lived in the Arctic regions, such as Thule and Hyperborea. Progressing onward, the book looks at modern polar legends: including the survival of Hitler, German bases in Antarctica, UFOs, the hollow earth, and the hidden kingdoms of Agartha and Shambhala. Chapters include: Prologue in Hyperborea; The Golden Age; The Imperishable Sacred Land; The Northern Lights; The Arctic Homeland; The Aryan Myth; The Thule Society; The Black Order; The Hidden Lands; Agartha and the Polaires; Shambhala; The Hole at the Pole; Antarctica; Arcadia Regained; The Symbolic Pole; Polar and Solar Traditions; The Spiritual Pole; The Catastrophists; The Uniformitarians; Polar Wandering; more.
 

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User Review  - AndreasJ - LibraryThing

Well, this was a disappointment. I'd been led to expect a scholarly overview of "polar mythology", but it turns out Godwin is a credulous esotericist himself. For example, noting that Blavatsky's and ... Read full review

Contents

Preface
7
The Golden Age
13
The Imperishable Sacred Land
19
The Arctic Homeland
27
The Aryan Myth
37
The Thule Society
47
The Black Order
63
Agartha and the Polaires
79
The Symbolic Pole
141
Polar and Solar Traditions
155
The Spiritual Pole
167
The Catastrophists
181
The Uniformitarians
193
Composite Theories
205
Polar Wandering
215
The Restoration
223

Shambhala
95
The Hole at the Pole
105
Antarctica
125
Endnotes
229
Sources of Illustrations
251
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About the author (1996)

Educated at Cambridge and Cornell, JOSCELYN GODWIN, Ph.D., is a professor of music at Colgate University and the author, editor, and translator of more than 30 books, including Athanasius Kircher's Theatre of the World. Known for his translations of the works of Fabre d'Olivet and Julius Evola as well as Francesco Colonna's Hypnerotomachia Poliphili, he lives in Hamilton, New York.

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