Around the Tea-table

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Cowperthwait, 1875 - Christian life - 504 pages
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Page 158 - The old blind school-master, John Milton, hath published a tedious poem on the Fall of Man — if its length be not considered as merit, it has no other.
Page 165 - And it came to pass, when they had brought them forth abroad, that he said, Escape for thy life ; look not behind thee, neither stay thou in all the plain ; escape to the mountain, lest thou be consumed.
Page 146 - Blind, or broken, or maimed, or having a wen, or scurvy, or scabbed, ye shall not offer these unto the Lord, nor make an offering by fire of them upon the altar unto the Lord.
Page 441 - Behold I will send you Elijah the prophet before the coming of the great and dreadful day of the Lord : and he shall turn the hearts of the fathers to the children, and the hearts of the children to their fathers, lest I come and smite the earth with a curse ' — coupled with the declarations concerning John the Baptist, particularly that in Luke i.
Page 104 - So let all thine enemies perish, O Lord, but let them that love thee be as the sun when he goeth forth in his might.
Page 307 - Waft, waft, ye winds, his story, And you, ye waters, roll, Till like a sea of glory, It spreads from pole to pole ; Till o'er our ransomed nature The Lamb for sinners slain, Redeemer, King, Creator, In bliss returns to reign.
Page 138 - He that passeth by, and meddleth with strife belonging not to him, is like one that taketh a dog by the ears.
Page 468 - Eyes have they; but they see not. Ears have they ; but they hear not.
Page 470 - I know thy works, that thou art neither cold nor hot: I would thou wert cold or hot. So then because thou art lukewarm, and neither cold nor hot, I will spew thee out of my mouth.
Page 305 - God, to order and dispose of the affairs of the people at all seasons as occasion shall require ; do therefore associate and conjoin ourselves to be as one Public State or Commonwealth; and do for ourselves and our successors and such as shall be adjoined to us at any time hereafter, enter into Combination and Confederation together...

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