Art as Spiritual Activity: Rudolf Steiner's Contribution to the Visual Arts

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SteinerBooks, 1998 - Art - 323 pages
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This book introduces a new way for thinking about, creating, and viewing art. Rudolf Steiner saw his task as the renewal of the lost unity of science, the arts, and religion; thus, he created a new, cognitive scientific and religious art in anthroposophy. The implications of his act recognized by such diverse artists as Wassily Kandinsky and Joseph Beuys are only now coming fully to light.
In his thorough introduction of more than a hundred pages, Michael Howard takes readers through these thought-provoking chapters:
  • Is Art Dead?
  • To Muse or Amuse
  • Artistic Activity As Spiritual Activity
  • The Representative of Humanity
  • Beauty, Creativity, and Metamorphosis
  • New Directions in Art
Lectures include:
  • The Aesthetics of Goethe s Worldview
  • The Spiritual Being of Art
  • Buildings Will Speak
  • The Sense Organs and Aesthetic Experience
  • The Two Sources of Art
  • The Building at Dornach
  • The Supersensible Origin of the Arts
  • Truth, Beauty, and Goodness
  • Christ, Ahriman, and Lucifer
  • Plus a bibliography and index
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Contents

Is Art Dead?
3
Artistic Activity as Spiritual Activity
12
The Representative of Humanity
36
LECTURES
104
The Aesthetics of Goethes Worldview L 1
113
The Spiritual Being of Art L 2
135
Buildings Will Speak L 3
154
The Building at Dornach L 6
214
The Supersensible Origin of the Arts L 7
237
Anthroposophy and the Visual Arts L 8
250
Truth Beauty and Goodness L 9
272
BIBLIOGRAPHY
297
INDEX
315
Copyright

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Page 8 - The problem is not that television presents us with entertaining subject matter but that all subject matter is presented as entertaining, which is another issue altogether.
Page 3 - Could it be possible? This old saint in the forest has not yet heard anything of this, that God is dead!
Page 3 - To-day artists and those who love artists seem like fossils. Imagine a megatherium or a diplodocus stalking the streets of Paris! There you have the impression that we must make upon our contemporaries. Ours is an epoch of engineers and of manufacturers, not one of artists. The search in modern life is for utility; the endeavor is to improve existence materially. Every day, science invents new processes for the feeding, clothing, or transportation of man; she manufactures cheaply inferior products...
Page 3 - ... day, science invents new processes for the feeding, clothing, or transportation of man; she manufactures cheaply inferior products in order to give adulterated luxuries to the greatest number — though it is true that she has also made real improvements in all that ministers to our daily wants. But it is no longer a question of spirit, of thought, of dreams. Art is dead. "Art is contemplation. It is the pleasure of the mind which searches into nature and which there divines the spirit by which...

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About the author (1998)

Austrian-born Rudolf Steiner was a noted Goethe (see Vol. 2) scholar and private student of the occult who became involved with Theosophy in Germany in 1902, when he met Annie Besant (1847--1933), a devoted follower of Madame Helena P. Blavatsky (1831--1891). In 1912 he broke with the Theosophists because of what he regarded as their oriental bias and established a system of his own, which he called Anthroposophy (anthro meaning "man"; sophia sophia meaning "wisdom"), a "spiritual science" he hoped would restore humanism to a materialistic world. In 1923 he set up headquarters for the Society of Anthroposophy in New York City. Steiner believed that human beings had evolved to the point where material existence had obscured spiritual capacities and that Christ had come to reverse that trend and to inaugurate an age of spiritual reintegration. He advocated that education, art, agriculture, and science be based on spiritual principles and infused with the psychic powers he believed were latent in everyone. The world center of the Anhthroposophical Society today is in Dornach, Switzerland, in a building designed by Steiner. The nonproselytizing society is noted for its schools.

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