Art, Psychotherapy, and Psychosis

Front Cover
Katherine Killick, Joy Schaverien
Psychology Press, 1997 - Psychology - 267 pages
Art, Psychotherapy and Psychosis reveals the unique role of art therapy in the treatment of psychosis. Illustrating their contributions with clinical material and artwork created by clients, experienced practitioners describe their work in a variety of settings. Writing from different theoretical standpoints they reflect the current creative diversity within the profession and its links with psychotherapy, psychoanalysis, analytical psychology and psychiatry.
In part I specific issues involved in working with psychosis are explored. These include discussion of the therapeutic relationship, the process of symbolisation, the nature and meaning of art made by psychotic patients and the interplay between words and pictures. Part II recounts the history of art therapy and psychosis, tracing its origins in art, to its present-day role as a respected treatment in psychiatric, community and therapeutic settings.
Art, Psychotherapy and Psychosis extends the existing theory, develops analytical approaches in art psychotherapy and offers innovative perspectives for students and practitioners on the treatment of borderline states as well as psychosis.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
clay and plasticine as experimental
52
Masturbation and painting
72
Four views of the image
84
Psychosis and the maturing ego
106
Has psychotic art become extinct?
131
The history of art therapy and psychosis 193895
144
a memoir
176
The forgotten people
198
a meeting place
219
Art psychotherapy and psychiatric rehabilitation
237
Index
261
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About the author (1997)

Katherine Killick is an analytical art therapist and psychotherapist in private practice, St Albans. Joy Schaverien is a jungian analyst and art psychotherapist in private practice, Leicestershire and an Associate Professional Member of the Society of Analytical Psychology. All contributors to this book are Registered Members of the British Association of Art Therapists.

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