Art Education the True Industrial Education

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C. W. Bardeen, 1897 - Art - 29 pages
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Page 68 - But opposed to this oriental idea, the Greek religion made beauty the essential feature of the idea of the divine, and hence his art is created as an act of worship of the beautiful. It represents the supreme attainment of the world in pure beauty, because it is pure beauty and nothing beyond. Christianity reaches beyond beauty to holiness. Other heathen religions fall short of the Greek idea and lack an essential element which the Greek religion possessed.
Page 68 - Harmony is this agreement of the inner and outer, of the will and the body, of the idea and its expression, so that the external leads us directly to the internal, of which it is the expression. Gracefulness then results, and gracefulness is the characteristic of classic or Greek art.
Page 59 - ... artist. England has gone forward rapidly in the direction of producing works of taste, and her useful manufactures, heretofore made without reference to beauty, have improved in tastefulness of design and execution. "The establishment of a great national art gallery, the Louvre, and the studies of French savants in the canons of good taste had long before revolutionized French manufactures and given France the supremacy in the world market for goods that command high prices and ready sale.
Page 56 - But aesthetic education — the cultivation of taste, the acquirement of knowledge on the subject of the origin of the idea of beauty ( both its historic origin and the philosophical account of its source in human nature), the practice of producing the outlines of the beautiful by the arts of drawing, painting and modeling, the criticism of works of art, with a view to discover readily the causes of failure or of success in esthetic effects — all these things we must claim form the true foundation...
Page 74 - They reverenced mountains and rivers, and the stormwinds and great natural forces that were destructive to the individuality of man, but also reverenced life in animals. They founded asylums for aged cows, but not for decrepit humanity. Persian art adored light as the divine; it also adored the bodies that give light — the sun, moon, and stars; also fire; also whatever is purifying, especially water. The Persian religion conceives two deities — a god of light and goodness, and a god of darkness...
Page 85 - Education, Three Lectures on the Practice of. I. On Marking, by HW EVE, MA II. On Stimulus, by A. SIDGWICK, MA III. On the Teaching of Latin Verse Composition, by EA ABBOTT, DD zs. Stimulus. A Lecture delivered for the Teachers' Training Syndicate, May, 1882, by A.
Page 68 - Greek religion made beauty the essential feature of the idea of the divine, and hence his art is created as an act of worship of the beautiful. It represents the supreme attainment of the world in pure beauty, because it is pure beauty and nothing beyond. Christianity reaches beyond beauty to holiness. Other heathen religions fall short of the Greek ideal, and lack an essential element which the Greek religion possessed. The Greeks believed that the divine is at the same time human; and human not...
Page 71 - ... but their gracefulness and serenity — their "classic repose." Whether the statues represent gods and heroes in action or in sitting and reclining postures, there is this "repose" which means indwelling vital activity and not mere rest as opposed to mo%fenjent.
Page 75 - Persian in that it conceived the divine as much more near human life, still resorted to animal forms to obtain the peculiarly divine attributes. There were the sacred bulls Apis and Mnevis, the goat of Mendes, sacred hawks and ibis, and such divinities as Isis-Hathor, with a cow's head ; Touaris, with a crocodile's head; Thoth, with the head of an ibis; Horus, with the head of a hawk ; but Ammon, and Pthah, and Osiris, with human heads and bodies. Thus we see that the Egyptian wavered between the...
Page 67 - ... desire of the soul, if made an act of the will, found expression in the body. When the soul is not at ease in the body, but is conscious of it as something separate, gracefulness departs, and awkwardness takes its place. The awkward person does not know what to do with his hands and arms; he cannot think just how he would carry his body or fix the muscles of his face. He chews a stick or bites a cigar in order to have something to do with the facial muscles, or twirls a cane or twists his watch-chain,...

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