Arthur Ashe on Tennis: Strokes, Strategy, Traditions, Players, Psychology, and Wisdom

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Knopf, 1995 - Sports & Recreation - 143 pages
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Arthur Ashe was not only a great tennis champion but a great teacher and analyst of the game he loved. In this book - delayed in its publication while Arthur completed his memoir Days of Grace - he shares the incomparable store of brilliance, experience, strategy, technique, and all-around tennis wisdom he acquired in the course of his remarkable life: as player in training, as winner of three Grand Slam titles, as two-time number-one-ranking player, as Davis Cup captain, as superb and instinctive teaching pro, as television commentator, as writer for Tennis magazine. Arthur speaks to players at all levels. In addressing the questions he was most often asked, he details an approach to the game built on fundamentals - strokes, grips, serves, returns of serve - and match-tested strategies: when to change your game plan, playing percentage tennis, covering the court. In addition, he stresses the aspect of tennis for which he was particularly known: the mental game. He helps you to understand both your own game and your opponent's, explaining body language and the element of surprise, and breaking a match down to its key points. His comments on players past and present - from Pancho Gonzalez and Rod Laver to Andre Agassi, Steffi Graf, and Pete Sampras - illuminate essential areas of tennis.

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Arthur Ashe on tennis: strokes, strategy, traditions, players, psychology, and wisdom

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McNab, a contributing editor at Tennis magazine, worked with Ashe on this book for two years prior to Ashe's death in 1993. The intent was for Ashe to answer those questions about the game that he was ... Read full review

Contents

Role Models 5 Tailor Your Game to Your Size 6
11
Point Your Shoulder 14 The Service Toss 14 Ser
20
My FiveShotsaPoint Rule 29 Make Up Your Mind
29
Copyright

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About the author (1995)

Arthur Ashe was born in Richmond, Virginia, in 1943, and died in New York City on February 6, 1993. In his twenty-year tennis career Ashe won some of the most coveted singles championship games; Wimbledon, the U.S. Open, and the World Cup Team Finals. He was a member of the U.S. Davis Cup Team from 1963 to 1970, and in 1975, 1976, and 1978; as its captain, he led the team to victories in 1981 and 1982. He was a member of the U.S. World Cup Team from 1970 to 1976, and in 1979.

On April 16, 1980, after quadruple bypass surgury, Arthur Ashe retired from professional tennis. He became National Campaign Chairman for the American Heart Association and the only nonmedical member of the National Heart, Lung and Blood Advisory Council.

He contracted the HIV virus from a blood transfusion after a second bypass operation in 1983. Upon discovering this, Ashe exhibited his perennial quality of action without acrimony and founded the Arthur Ashe Foundation for the Defeat of AIDS, He succumbed to the disease in February 1993.

Ashe was married to professional photographer Jeanne Moutoussamy-Ashe, the author of Viewifnders: Black Women Photographers. They lived in New York City with their daughter, Camera.

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