Arthur's Home Magazine, Volume 1

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T. S. Arthur, 1858
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Page 11 - Cast thy bread upon the waters, and thou shalt find it after many days.
Page 305 - FOR the strength of the hills we bless thee, Our God, our fathers' God ! Thou hast made thy children mighty, By the touch of the mountain sod.
Page 408 - AWAKE, jEolian lyre, awake, And give to rapture all thy trembling strings. From Helicon's harmonious springs A thousand rills their mazy progress take : The laughing flowers, that round them blow, Drink life and fragrance as they flow. Now the rich stream of music winds along, Deep, majestic, smooth, and strong, Through verdant vales, and Ceres...
Page 246 - SOME murmur, when their sky is clear And wholly bright to view, If one small speck of dark appear In their great heaven of blue. And some with thankful love are filled, If but one streak of light, One ray of God's good mercy gild The darkness of their night. In palaces are hearts that ask, In discontent and pride, Why life is such a dreary task, And all good things denied. And hearts in poorest huts admire How Love has in their aid (Love that not ever seems to tire) Such rich provision made.
Page 409 - Lap me in soft Lydian airs, Married to immortal verse, Such as the meeting soul may pierce In notes with many a winding bout Of linked sweetness long drawn out, 140 With wanton heed and giddy cunning, The melting voice through mazes running, Untwisting all the chains that tie The hidden soul of harmony; That Orpheus...
Page 94 - For the Lord God is a sun and shield: the Lord will give grace and glory: no good thing will he withhold from them that walk uprightly.
Page 325 - But mankind — the race would perish did they cease to aid each other. — From the time that the mother binds the child's head, till the moment that some kind assistant wipes the death-damp from the brow of the dying, we cannot exist without mutual help. All, therefore, that need aid, have right to ask it of their fellow-mortals ; no one who has the power of granting can refuse it without guilt.
Page 132 - And woman's tears fell fast, and children wailed aloud. Then rose another hoary man and said, In faltering accents, to that weeping train, " Why mourn ye that our aged friend is dead ? Ye are not sad to see the gathered grain, Nor when their mellow fruit...
Page 128 - An excellent clergyman, possessing much knowledge of human nature, instructed his large family of daughters, in the theory and practice of music. They were all observed to be exceedingly amiable and happy. A friend inquired if there was any secret in his mode of education. He replied, "when...
Page 444 - I may have but a minute to speak to you. My dear, be a good man - be virtuous - be religious - be a good man. Nothing else will give you any comfort when you come to lie here.

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