Arts and Cultural Programs on Radio and Television: A Condensation of a Report Prepared by Research and Programming Services, February 1977

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National Endowment for the Arts, 1977 - Mass media and the arts - 85 pages
 

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Page 43 - ... quote from a survey report or survey data in such a way as to create a misleading impression of the results of the survey, as by unfairly basing audience claims on results achieved only during certain periods of the broadcast day or on a survey of only a segment of the total potential audience. 2. Audience data are based on sample surveys not derived from complete measurements of audiences. As such, they are statistical estimates, and, at best are of only limited reliability due to errors and...
Page 43 - Audience data are based on sample surveys not derived from complete measurements of audiences. As such, they are statistical estimates, and, at best are of only limited reliability due to errors and distortions inherent in the statistical methods yielding such data. Claims as to audience coverage based on audience surveys should therefore be qualified in recognition of the fact that survey data are inherently imperfect. Any such claim should be accompanied by a disclosure that any figures cited or...
Page 31 - APPLICANTS This information about the National Endowment for the Humanities media program is intended for qualified applicants seeking funds for an organized project which by use of electronic media or film, provides knowledge and understanding of the humanities for a broad adult audience.
Page 36 - A wide range of data is reported by the NTI/NAC service. At the simplest level, the NTI meters are used to estimate the percentage of all US homes with TV that were watching a given network, this is known as a rating. From this, an extrapolation estimates the number of homes in the audience for a program.
Page 36 - TV set in the home. Respondents are supposed to fill in all programs viewed by all household members. In addition, a "recordimeter" is attached to each set. It measures the number of hours the set is in use and produces "an audio/visual reminder signal" every half -hour of set use to encourage diary entries.
Page 1 - There are just under l,000 television stations (700 commercial and 250 public) and over 8,000 radio stations in the United States. The television industry is dominated by the three commercial networks which account for most prime time programming on approximately 600 network affiliates.
Page 38 - Days are divided into fifteen-minute periods, and respondents are asked to indicate whether the set was on or off; if it was on, they are asked for the channel, the program, and members of the household who were watching.
Page 38 - Phone calls are made to prospective sample homes to enlist cooperation. (Arbitron precedes the phone call with a letter.) The calls also help determine the number of television sets in the home. Then diaries are sent (one for each set) along with "a cash incentive
Page 36 - Thus, no response is required by anyone in the home, and the meters are as close to an unobtrusive viewing indicator as anything yet devised.

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