As American as Shoofly Pie: The Foodlore and Fakelore of Pennsylvania Dutch Cuisine

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University of Pennsylvania Press, Apr 5, 2013 - Cooking - 318 pages
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When visitors travel to Pennsylvania Dutch Country, they are encouraged to consume the local culture by way of "regional specialties" such as cream-filled whoopie pies and deep-fried fritters of every variety. Yet many of the dishes and confections visitors have come to expect from the region did not emerge from Pennsylvania Dutch culture but from expectations fabricated by local-color novels or the tourist industry. At the same time, other less celebrated (and rather more delicious) dishes, such as sauerkraut and stuffed pork stomach, have been enjoyed in Pennsylvania Dutch homes across various localities and economic strata for decades.

Celebrated food historian and cookbook writer William Woys Weaver delves deeply into the history of Pennsylvania Dutch cuisine to sort fact from fiction in the foodlore of this culture. Through interviews with contemporary Pennsylvania Dutch cooks and extensive research into cookbooks and archives, As American as Shoofly Pie offers a comprehensive and counterintuitive cultural history of Pennsylvania Dutch cuisine, its roots and regional characteristics, its communities and class divisions, and, above all, its evolution into a uniquely American style of cookery. Weaver traces the origins of Pennsylvania Dutch cuisine as far back as the first German settlements in America and follows them forward as New Dutch Cuisine continues to evolve and respond to contemporary food concerns. His detailed and affectionate chapters present a rich and diverse portrait of a living culinary practice—widely varied among different religious sects and localized communities, rich and poor, rural and urban—that complicates common notions of authenticity.

Because there's no better way to understand food culture than to practice it, As American as Shoofly Pie's cultural history is accompanied by dozens of recipes, drawn from exacting research, kitchen-tested, and adapted to modern cooking conventions. From soup to Schnitz, these dishes lay the table with a multitude of regional tastes and stories.

Hockt eich hie mit uns, un esst eich satt—Sit down with us and eat yourselves full!

 

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I have not read your book. Alexander Vanasdall is my great-great grandfather. The cabin was not demolished but was covered with siding. I have a picture of Alexander's daughter, Leah Vanasdall Shank in front of the cabin. She is elderly looking in the picture. She died in 1922. The owners of the cabin gave me copies of the old deed when his grandson settled the estate., I am certainly going to look up this book. Lanette Yohn PS: my email is Lanette.yohn @ gmail.com 

Contents

It Began in Bethlehem
11
Our Dumpling Culture and the Swabian Third
35
Tourism Reshapes a Food Icon
42
We Aint Towner
49
The Creation of the Amish Table
67
The Cabbage Curtain
87
Waffle Palaces
97
Consider the Groundhog
109
Dunk Babies Christmas Cookies Dunke Bobblin
212
Grated Potato Soup Gerieuuenesupp
218
Hairy Dumplings Hooriche Gnepp
219
Mock Fish Blinde Fische
226
Onion Tart with Cornmeal Crust
232
Pickled Okra With Summer Sausage
239
Potato Potpie With Saffron
246
PunXsutawney Spice Cookies
250

The Amish Table Goes Dutch
119
The Kutztown Folk Festival
149
New Dutch Cuisine and
169
REclPEs
178
Apple Schnitz Pie Ebbelschnitz Boz
185
Baked Potato Fingers Schpeckgrumbiere odder
187
Boys Bits Buueschpitzle
193
BroWned Flour Soup Gereeschte Mehlsupp
199
Chopped Soup Gehacktesupp
206
Shoofly Pie Melassich Riuuelboi
256
Steamed Yeast Dumplings Dampfgnepp
262
SweetandSour Marinated Shad SiessunSauere Schaed
269
RECIPES BY CATEGORY
276
NOTES
285
BIBLIOGRAPHY
291
INDEX
305
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
317
Copyright

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About the author (2013)

William Woys Weaver is an independent food historian and author of numerous books, including Culinary Ephemera: An Illustrated History and Sauerkraut Yankees: Pennsylvania Dutch Food and Foodways. He also directs the Keystone Center for the Study of Regional Foods and Food Tourism and maintains the Roughwood Seed Collection for heirloom food plants.

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