As You Like It: Shakespeare at Stratford Series

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Cengage Learning EMEA, 2003 - Drama - 260 pages
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In a period during which a play previously staged very traditionally was represented in a variety of original ways, Robert Smallwood looks at what we could call the 'Seven Ages of As You Like It' by considering just what directors, designers and actors did differently to make their vision original. How are the environments of the court and the Forest of Arden presented; bleak and chilling or welcoming and celebratory? What does each actress bring to the crucial role of Rosalind that will help show the journey from her relationship with Celia to that with Orlando? How are the anti-romantic Touchstone and Jaques portrayed? How successfully is Hymen, the god of marriage, brought to the stage? This engaging volume celebrates the rich performance history of an always popular play. In a period during which a play previously staged very traditionally was represented in a variety of original ways, Robert Smallwood looks at what we could call the 'Seven Ages of As You Like It' by considering just what directors, designers and actors did differently to make their vision original. How are the environments of the court and the Forest of Arden presented; bleak and chilling or welcoming and celebratory? What does each actress bring to the crucial role of Rosalind that will help show the journey from her relationship with Celia to that with Orlando? How are the anti-romantic Touchstone and Jaques portrayed? How successfully is Hymen, the god of marriage, brought to the stage? This engaging volume celebrates the rich performance history of an always popular play.
 

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Contents

THE ENVIOUS COURT
19
NOW AM I IN ARDEN
46
JUNOS SWANS
72
WOO ME
99
THAT I WERE A FOOL
135
COUNTRY COPULATIVES
167
RUSTIC REVELRY
189
APPENDICES
216
Reviews cited
238
Bibliography
251
Copyright

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About the author (2003)

Robert Smallwood is Director of Courses at the Shakespeare Institute of the University of Birmingham.

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