As Seen from the Ranks: A Boy in the Civil War

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G. P. Putnam's sons, 1902 - United States - 292 pages
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Contents

II
11
III
24
VI
54
X
99
XI
110
XII
124
XIV
146
XV
158
XVI
169
XVIII
189
XIX
199
XX
208
XXII
232
XXIII
248
XXIV
262
XXVI
287

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Page 282 - Their silent tents are spread, And Glory guards, with solemn round, The bivouac of the dead. No rumor of the foe's advance Now swells upon the wind ; No troubled thought at midnight haunts Of loved ones left behind; No vision of the morrow's strife The warrior's dream alarms; No braying horn nor screaming fife At dawn shall call to arms.
Page 196 - Thus in silence in dreams' projections, Returning, resuming, I thread my way through the hospitals, The hurt and wounded I pacify with soothing hand, I sit by the restless all the dark night, some are so young, Some suffer so much, I recall the experience sweet and sad, (Many a soldier's loving arms about this neck have cross'd and rested, Many a soldier's kiss dwells on these bearded lips...
Page 290 - Schofield from Nashville to cooperate with me in North Carolina. This march was like the thrust of a sword through the heart of a human body, each mile of which swept aside all opposition, consumed the very food on which the army depended for life, and demonstrated a power in the National Government which was irresistible.
Page 257 - A little loose in foraging, they "did some things they ought not to have done," yet, on the whole, they have supplied the wants of the army with as little violence as could be expected, and as little loss as I calculated.
Page 72 - Eidge one of the most stupendous scenes in nature, and well worth a voyage across the Atlantic to witness.
Page 265 - ... all to be heard and seen only by glimpses under the smoke, and muffled by the Niagara-like roar of the flames as they licked up the turpentine and pitch in the great vats.
Page 264 - Benton saw weird beauty in the scene: ... in the endless blue columns swaying with the long, swinging step which became such a marked characteristic of the men who marched down to the sea; in the long bugle peal and rumbling artillery with chafing horses; in the glimmer of muskets and sabers; and all to be heard and seen only by glimpses under the smoke and muffled by the Niagara-like roar of the flames as they licked up turpentine and pitch. Now came rolling back from the depths of the pine forest,...
Page 146 - We are not enemies, but friends. We must not be enemies. Though passion may have strained, it must not break our bonds of affection. "The mystic chords of memory, stretching from every battle-field and patriot grave to every living hearth and hearthstone all over this broad land, will yet swell the chorus of the Union, when again touched, as surely as they will be, by the better angels of our nature.
Page 52 - The Light Brigade took 673 officers and men into that charge ; they lost 113 killed and 134 wounded ; total, 247 or 36 7-10 per cent.
Page 264 - ... sap in notches on tree trunks. Colonel Hamilton wrote that "it looked like a fire in a cathedral; the smoke could hardly escape through the green canopy, and hung like a pall." Stretcher-bearer Benton saw weird beauty in the scene: ... in the endless blue columns swaying with the long, swinging step which became such a marked characteristic of the men who marched down to the sea; in the long bugle peal and rumbling artillery with chafing horses; in the glimmer of muskets and sabers; and all to...

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