"Ask Mamma;" Or, The Richest Commoner in England

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Bradbury, Agnew & Company, 1858 - 412 pages
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Page 95 - But towards the close of the last century and at the beginning of the present, experiment was greatly stimulated by the wants of the British navy.
Page 92 - I don't know which— and to please the aforesaid fatuous handful of individuals, who have more money than they know what to do with...
Page 148 - And all their painful drudgeries repay With disappointment and severe remorse. But husband thou thy pleasures, and give scope To all her subtle play : by Nature led A thousand shifts she tries ; t...
Page 121 - A straight and flat back, with never a hump ; She's wide in her hips, and calm in her eyes, She's fine in her shoulders, and thin in her thighs. She's light in her neck, and small in her tail. She's wide in her breast, and good at the pail, She's fine in her bone, and silky of skin, She's a grazier's without, and a butcher's within.
Page v - It may be a recommendation to the lover of light literature to be told that the following story does not involve the complication of a plot.
Page 121 - A straight and flat back without ever a hump ; She's wide in her hips, and calm in her eyes, She's fine in her shoulders, and thin in her thighs She's light in her neck, and small in her tail, She's wide at the breast, and good at the pail. She's fine in her bone and silky of skin, She's a grazier's without, and a butcher's within.
Page 95 - These, Clara, Flora, and Harriet, were very pretty, and very highly educated — that is to say, they could do everything that is useless — play, draw, sing, dance, make wax flowers, bead-stands, do decorative gilding, and crochet work...
Page 203 - I have always thought a Huntsman a happy man ; his office is pleasing, and at the same time flattering ; we pay him for that which diverts him, and he is enriched by his greatest pleasure ; nor is a general after a victory more proud than is a Huntsman who returns with his fox's head.

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