Asking the Right Questions about Schools: A Parent's Guide

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Scarecrow Press, 2002 - Education - 244 pages
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Parents who want to be more involved in their child's education, who want to be aware of what their child should be learning, and who want to be an informed part of the education process, need to read this book. The first half of the book guides parents into an understanding of what a good education should look like—what skills and content children should learn, and the characteristics of a successful school. The second half is an action guide for improving education—keeping children from academic failure, raising standards, improving school safety, classroom teaching, and academic accountability. Each chapter stands alone, and together, the result is a handbook for the informed parent.
 

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Contents

How Well Is Your Child Doing in School?
3
What Should Your Child Learn?
29
What Has Your Child Learned?
83
How Good Are Your Local Schools?
101
Making Schools Better
133
Preventing Academic Failure
135
Raising Academic Standards
149
Improving School Safety and Discipline
161
Improving Classroom Teaching and School Management
173
Making Incentives Work
187
Improving Accountability in Education
199
Getting Involved
209
Resources for Parents
231
Glossary
237
About the Author
244
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About the author (2002)

Chrys Dougherty is the director of research at Just for the Kids, Austin, Texas. He previously had published an earlier edition of this book under the title Improving Your Child's Education: A Parent's Handbook for Working with Schools.