Aspects of Peacekeeping

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D. Stuart Gordon, F. H. Toase
Psychology Press, 2001 - History - 286 pages
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The nature of UN operational involvement in the practical management of conflict has evolved dramatically since the end of the Cold War. The post-Cold War liberation of the Security Council, the subsequent paralysis in its decision-making competence, and the apparent dilution of the concept of sovereignty as a prohibition on intervention have been principal factors in the evolving fortunes of UK peace-support operations.

This evolving environment has had profound implications for the way in which the humanitarian community, the United Nations and military forces engaged under a UN flag have reacted to peace-support operations. This book explores contemporary peace-support operations and examines many of the principal challenges that now confront those charged, in different ways, with bringing peace to war-torn societies. In particular, this volume looks at the evolving nature of military, UN and humanitarian non-governmental organization's intervention in these complex conflicts. It also explores how these organizations relate to one another and the way in which a division of labour is determined.

 

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Contents

The Humanitarian Security Dilemma in International
3
The Evolution of UN Command
19
The Muddled
42
Bilateral and Multilateral Peacekeeping Units in Central and
60
Regional Initiatives and NonUN Forms of Intervention in
78
What Are the
163
Military
181
A Critique
199
A Recipe for Making Safe Areas Unsafe
213
Soldiers Building Bridges
231
Warlordism Complex Emergencies and the Search for a
253
Index
275
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