Asperger Syndrome and Psychotherapy: Understanding Asperger Perspectives

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Jessica Kingsley Publishers, Jan 28, 2003 - Psychology - 176 pages
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People with Asperger Syndrome (AS) understand and respond to the world in a very different way from people without this condition. The challenge for psychotherapists working with Asperger clients lies in setting aside their own preconceptions and learning to understand their client's perspective. Behaviour that, in a 'neurotypical' client, may be evidence of a problem, in an Asperger client may simply be a manifestation of Asperger ways of approaching the world. Paula Jacobsen, an experienced child psychotherapist, demonstrates how to interpret classic analytic and psychodynamic theories in relation to people with AS and explains how revised theories of mind, executive functioning and central coherence have helped provide new concepts and language with which to properly articulate the experiences of those with AS. The importance of the therapeutic relationship, case management, the need for collaboration between professionals, school consultation and educational needs of children with AS are also discussed at length, and illustrated with case studies. Providing an in-depth analysis of AS from a psychotherapist's point of view, this original book makes compelling reading for parents, families, teachers and those with AS, as well as for professionals in this area.
 

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Contents

Acknowledgements
7
Preface
9
Clinical Work with Asperger Syndrome
11
Case Management
93
Afterword
119
Professional Services
123
School Observations
131
Formal School Meetings
143
Items for Consideration when Developing a Behavior Plan
145
Developing a Reference Binder
152
References
166
Index
168
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About the author (2003)

Paula Jacobsen is a psychotherapist and licensed clinical social worker and is part of the West Valley Group Association of Psychotherapists in California. She has thirty years experience as a child psychotherapist and was also a Clinical Faculty supervisor in the Child Psychiatry Division at Stanford University. More recently, she has taught education courses for psychologists and clinical social workers and these have predominantly focused on the clinical presentation, clinical interventions, and case management of Asperger Syndrome.

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