Assessing Learning: Librarians and Teachers as Partners

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Libraries Unlimited, 2005 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 149 pages
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Focusing on the role of library media specialists in assessing student learning, this is the first full-length book written to address its practical application in the school library media center. It is an important book for school librarians to consider as they address their role as teachers in schools and the accountability issues associated with that role. It places students at the center of the assessment equation and addresses the following topics as they relate specifically to school library instructional programs: purposes of assessment, essential elements of assessment, knowing what to assess, multiple methods for assessment, and management and communication of assessment results. The book's primary audiences are library media specialists and teachers in K-12 settings. It is also relevant for other educators, who are centrally involved in K-12 programs including district, regional and state library media coordinators, building level administrators, and library school educators. The authors cull from their own 30-year careers as library practitioners, university instructors, and workshop presenters to present doable, practical methods for the library media specialist to be involved in assessing student learning. Though this topic appears in the theoretical literature and is addressed in journal articles or chapters in contributed books, this is the first practical in-depth analysis for the school library field.

Focusing on the role of library media specialists in assessing student learning, this is the first full-length book written to address its practical application in the school library media center. It is an important book for school librarians to consider as they address their role as teachers in schools and the accountability issues associated with that role. It places students at the center of the assessment equation and addresses the following topics as they relate specifically to school library instructional programs: purposes of assessment, essential elements of assessment, knowing what to assess, multiple methods for assessment, and management and communication of assessment results. The book's primary audiences are library media specialists and teachers in K-12 settings. It is also relevant for other educators, who are centrally involved in K-12 programs including district, regional and state library media coordinators, building level administrators, and library school educators. The authors cull from their own 30-year careers as library practitioners, university instructors, and workshop presenters to present doable, practical methods for the library media specialist to be involved in assessing student learning. Though this topic appears in the theoretical literature and is addressed in journal articles or chapters in contributed books, this is the first practical in-depth analysis for the school library field. Grades K-12.

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User Review  - davidloertscher - LibraryThing

The first edition of this book was a ground-breaking volume urging teacher librarians to go beyond the role of support and supply of information into the arena of building knowledge and learning how ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - ewyatt - LibraryThing

A professional read focused on the assessment process as a tool for improving practice and collecting evidence of the impact of the school librarian on learning. Emphasis on outcome based planning with plenty of examples at the K-12 levels. Read full review

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About the author (2005)

Violet H. Harada is Professor of Library and Information Science at the University of Hawaii where she also coordinates the specialization for school library media preparation. In her 35-year career she has been a secondary English teacher, an elementary school library media specialist, a state level administrator, and a curriculum designer. In her current research and publications, she focuses on inquiry-based approaches to information seeking and use and on the dynamics of collaborative instruction. With Joan M. Yoshina, she is the co-author of Learning Through Inquiry: Librarian-Teacher Partnerships.

Joan M. Yoshina recently retired from the Hawaii Department of Education after 34 years as an elementary and high school teacher, a language arts specialist, and a library media specialist. She worked in both elementary and middle school libraries in Oahu. Joan has also published articles on the information search process and integrated instruction, guest lectured at the University of Hawaii, and presented her work at both state and national conferences.

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