Assessment As Learning: Using Classroom Assessment to Maximize Student Learning

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Corwin Press, May 7, 2003 - Education - 132 pages
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This book will provide teachers and school administrators with: an understanding of the reasons behind their confusion and discomfort by detailing the way that the changing role of schooling and our increasing knowledge about the nature of learning have made classroom assessment much more complex, with a range of different purposes that require differentiated assessment practices.
 

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Contents

Rethinking Assessment
5
Assessment of Learning for Learning and as Learning
21
A Focus on Learning
29
Assessment and Learning
42
Using Assessment to Identify
47
Thi s
52
Using Assessment to Motivate Learning
67
Using Assessment to Make Connections
78
Using Assessment to Extend Learning
89
Using Assessment for Reflection and SelfMonitoring
100
Using Assessment for Optimum Learning
110
References
123
Index
129
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About the author (2003)

Lorna M. Earl is a director of Aporia Consulting Ltd. and a retired associate professor from the Department of Theory and Policy Studies at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education of the University of Toronto. She was the first director of assessment for the Ontario Education Quality and Accountability Office, and she as been a researcher and research director in school districts for over 20 years.

Throughout her career, Earl has concentrated her efforts on policy and program evaluations as a vehicle to enhance learning for pupils and for organizations. She has done extensive work in the areas of literacy and the middle years, but has concentrated her efforts on issues related to evaluation of large-scale reform and assessment (large-scale and classroom) in many venues around the world. She has worked extensively in schools and school boards, and has been involved in consultation, research, and staff development with teachers' organizations, ministries of education, school districts, and charitable foundations. Earl holds a doctorate in epidemiology and biostatistics, as well as degrees in education and psychology.

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