Assisting Emigration to Upper Canada: The Petworth Project, 1832-1837

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McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP, Aug 30, 2000 - History - 354 pages
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Using a rich collection of contemporary sources, this study focuses on one group of English immigrants sent to Upper Canada from Sussex and other southern counties with the aid of parishes and landlords. In Part One, Wendy Cameron follows the work of the Petworth Emigration Committee over six years and trace how the immigrants were received in each of these years. In Part Two, Mary McDougall Maude presents a complete list of emigrants on Petworth ships from 1832 to 1837, including details of their background, family reconstructions, and additional information drawn from Canadian sources. Paternalism strong enough to slow the wheels of change is embodied here in Thomas Sockett, the organizer of the Petworth emigrations, and his patron, the Earl of Egremont, and in Lieutenant Governor Sir John Colborne in Upper Canada. The friction created as these men sought to sustain older values in the relationship between rich and poor highlights the shift in British emigration policy. In these years of transition immigrants sent by the Petworth Emigration Committee could accept assistance and the government direction that went with it, or they could rely on their own resources and find work for themselves. Once the transition was complete, the market-driven model took over and immigrants had to make their own best bargain for their labour.
 

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Contents

II
9
III
25
IV
42
V
77
VI
109
VII
143
VIII
173
IX
194
X
201
XI
203
XII
211
XIII
291
XIV
293
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About the author (2000)

Wendy Cameron is a visiting scholar at the Northrop Frye Centre, Victoria University at the University of Toronto.

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