Astoria: Or, Enterprise Beyond the Rocky Mountains, Volume 1

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Baudry's European Library, 1836 - Astoria (Or.) - 336 pages
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Page 136 - In Rama was there a voice heard, lamentation, and weeping, and great mourning, Rachel weeping for her children, and would not be comforted, because they are not.
Page 279 - and had the management of affairs, I would defy them all ; but as it is, every thing depends upon you and your friends about you. Our enterprise is grand, and deserves success, and I hope in God it will meet it. If my object was merely gain of money, I should say, think whether it is best to save what we can, and abandon the place ; but the very idea is like a dagger to my heart.
Page 331 - ... inches from the tip of the nose to the end of the tail. The body is from ten to twelve inches long.
Page 52 - ... by cords, which pass through holes on each side of the trough. As the tightening of the padding and the pressing of the head to the board is gradual, the process is said not to be attended with much pain. The appearance of the infant, however, while in this state of compression, is whimsically hideous, and "its little black eyes...
Page 68 - Thus far the Indian interpreter, from whom these particulars are derived, had been an eyewitness of the deadly conflict. He had taken no part in it, and had been spared by the natives as being of their race. In the confusion of the moment he took refuge with the rest, in the canoes. The survivors of the crew now sallied forth, and discharged some of the deck guns, which did great execution among the canoes, and drove all the savages to shore.
Page 3 - Indiaman and pirates are wont to do; for they lavish, eat, drink, and play all away as long as the goods hold out; and when these are gone, they even sell their embroidery, their lace and their clothes. This done they are forced upon a new voyage for subsistence."* Many of these coureurs des bois became so accustomed to the Indian mode of living, and the perfect freedom of the wilderness, that they lost all relish for civilization, and identified themselves with the savages among whom they dwelt,...
Page 85 - Another recruit that joined the camp at Nodowa deserves equal mention. This was John Day, a hunter from the backwoods of Virginia, who had been several years on the Missouri in the service of Mr. Crooks, and of other traders. He was about forty years of age, six feet two inches high, straight as an Indian ; with an elastic step as if he trod on springs, and a handsome, open, manly countenance. It was his boast that in his vounger days nothing could hurt or daunt him ; but. he had " lived too fast"...
Page 11 - He began his career, of course, on the narrowest scale ; but he brought to the task a persevering industry, rigid economy, and strict integrity. To these were added an aspiring spirit that always looked upward ; a genius bold, fertile, and expansive ; a sagacity quick to grasp and convert every circumstance to its advantage, and a singular and never wavering confidence of signal success...

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