Astro Boy and Anime Come to the Americas: An Insider's View of the Birth of a Pop Culture Phenomenon

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McFarland, Dec 4, 2008 - Performing Arts - 222 pages
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The first generation of American television programmers had few choices of Saturday morning children's offerings. That changed dramatically in 1963 when a Japanese animated television series called Tetsuan Atom was acquired for distribution by NBC. Fred Ladd adapted the show for American television and--rechristened Astro Boy--it was an overnight sensation. Astro Boy's popularity sparked a new industry importing animated television from Japan. Ladd went on to adapt numerous Japanese animated imports, and here provides an insider's view of the creation of an ongoing cultural and media phenomenon.
 

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Contents

Preface by Harvey Deneroff
1
Preface by Fred Ladd
5
1 Astro Boy
9
2 A Trip to Japan
30
3 Tetsujin 28 and 8th Man
41
4 Quixotically Comes Kimba
49
5 Mighty Mushi
65
6 More from Mushi
72
14 Speaking of Dying
131
15 Tezuka on Tezuka Yokoyama on Yokoyama
134
16 Samurai on Cels
138
17 Mars
140
18 Homogeneous? Yes Bisexual?
145
19 Giants among Giants
148
20 Other Giant Robots I Have Known
154
21 OVA + VHS + DVD Home Video
157

7 Marine Boy and Astro Boy
76
8 A Cinderella Process
79
9 Those 70s Shows
88
10 Sailor Moon
99
11 ANIMEnia The New Industry BloomsOvernight
103
12 Boy Meets Giant Robot
122
13 Religious Not Litigious
128
22 Fandom of the Anime
162
23 Anime Today
169
24 What Hath Tezuka Wrought?
189
Appendix 1
191
Appendix 2
194
Index
201
Copyright

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About the author (2008)

Writer and director Fred Ladd adapted Astro Boy, Gigantor, Kimba, The White Lion, The New Adventures of Gigantor, G-Force, Sailor Moon and other Japanese animated series for American television. Harvey Deneroff is a professor in the animation department of the Savannah College of Art and Design and is the founder of the Society for Animation Studies.

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