Astronomy: The Science of the Heavenly Bodies

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Harper & Brothers, 1922 - Astronomy - 384 pages
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Contents

I
9
II
19
III
23
IV
27
V
30
VI
33
VII
37
VIII
42
XXXIV
227
XXXV
235
XXXVI
242
XXXVII
254
XXXVIII
260
XXXIX
264
XL
267
XLI
270

IX
45
X
49
XI
53
XII
57
XIII
62
XIV
66
XV
73
XVI
83
XVII
90
XIX
93
XX
102
XXI
111
XXII
125
XXIII
139
XXIV
152
XXV
162
XXVI
165
XXVII
174
XXVIII
189
XXX
193
XXXI
206
XXXII
209
XXXIII
219
XLII
273
XLIII
279
XLV
283
XLVII
290
XLVIII
294
XLIX
300
L
304
LI
307
LII
311
LIII
319
LIV
321
LV
324
LVI
331
LVII
334
LIX
336
LX
341
LXI
345
LXII
350
LXIII
357
LXV
361
LXVI
366
LXVII
380

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Page 210 - Less than archangel ruined, and the excess Of glory obscured ; as when the sun, new risen, Looks through the horizontal misty air Shorn of his beams, or from behind the moon, In dim eclipse, disastrous twilight sheds On half the nations, and with fear of change Perplexes monarchs.
Page 350 - To God's eternal house direct the way; A broad and ample road, whose dust is gold, And pavement stars, as stars to thee appear, Seen in the galaxy, that milky way Which nightly, as a circling zone, thou seest Powder'd with stars.
Page 162 - Venus a pea, on a circle 284 feet in diameter; the Earth also a pea, on a circle of 430 feet; Mars a rather large pin's head, on a circle of 654 feet...
Page 252 - The sun, viewed in this light, appears to be nothing else than a very eminent, large, and lucid planet, evidently the first, or, in strictness of speaking, the only primary one of our system ; all others being truly secondary to it.
Page 66 - that every particle of matter in the universe attracts every other particle, with a force whose direction is that of the line joining the two, and whose magnitude is directly as the product of their masses, and inversely as the square of their distances from each other.
Page 14 - All this was in the two plague years of 1665 and 1666, for in those days I was in the prime of my age for invention, and minded mathematics and philosophy more than at any time since.
Page 163 - ... feet; Jupiter a moderate-sized orange, in a circle nearly half a mile across; Saturn a small orange, on a circle of four-fifths of a mile; Uranus a full-sized cherry, or small plum, upon the circumference of a circle more than a mile and a half, and Neptune a good-sized plum on a circle about two miles and a half in diameter.
Page 336 - Trans. 1828) ; but it is from the observations of Sir John Herschel, at the Cape, that the knowledge of its splendid character is derived. That astronomer pronounces it, beyond all comparison, the richest and largest object of the kind in the heavens.
Page 273 - Threatening the world with famine, plague, and war ; To princes, death ; to kingdoms, many curses ; To all estates, inevitable losses ; To herdsmen, rot ; to ploughmen, hapless seasons ; To sailors, storms ; to cities, civil treasons.
Page 384 - Only the inertia of tradition keeps the contraction hypothesis alive — or rather, not alive, but an unburied corpse. But if we decide to inter the corpse, let us freely recognise the position in which we are left. A star is drawing on some vast reservoir of energy by means unknown to us. This reservoir can scarcely be other than the sub-atomic energy which, it is known, exists abundantly in all matter; we sometimes dream that man will one day learn to release it and use it for his service.

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