At-risk Students: Reaching and Teaching Them

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Eye On Education, 2004 - Education - 299 pages
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This book is organized around CBUPO, the basic psychological needs of all students: competence, ,belonging, usefulness, potency, and optimism. When teachers and schools focus on meeting these needs, the rate of at-riskness is drastically reduced. This book presents practical strategies and tips to help teachers and administrators help all students become successful learners. The revised edition offers new material on using classroom assessment, complying with standards and high stakes testing, an updated approach to evaluating At-Risk Prevention programs, and alternative strategies for meeting the motivational needs of at-risk youth, from developmental constructivism to mastery learning.
 

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Contents

Subjective View of Knowledge 74
74
Developmental Constructivist Learning 75
75
Allowing Enough Time for Learning 83
83
Mastery Expectations 84
84
Concluding Comment 85
85
References 86
86
Helping Students Develop a Sense of Belonging 87
87
Multicultural Educationand the Hidden Curriculum 90
90
Schools Where Discipline Is Effective 180
180
Principles and Processes for Effective Discipline 182
182
A Variety of Systems 186
186
Social Responsibility 189
189
Social Contracting 195
195
Concluding Comment 206
206
References 207
207
9 Schoolwide Initiatives That Reduce AtRiskness 209
209

Gregorc Style Delineator 100
100
An IllustrationHigh School Physics 102
102
Helpful Responses to Learning Style Differences 105
105
Bernice McCarthys 4MAT System 106
106
Teacher Expectations and Feelings of Belonging 113
113
The Special Case of Wait Time 116
116
Intelligence Reconsidered 119
119
References 125
125
6 Helping Students Build Feelings of Usefulness 127
127
Problem Based Learning and Student Directed Inquiry 130
130
Two Dimensions of Utility 131
131
Cooperative Learning 132
132
Cooperative Team Learning 137
137
Student Teams Achievement Divisions STAD 142
142
Jigsaw II 144
144
An Example of a Hybrid 145
145
Accountability and Roles 148
148
Community Service 150
150
Concluding Comment 153
153
References 154
154
7 Developing a Sense of Personal Potency 155
155
Choice Theory Explained 156
156
Understanding Attribution 158
158
Four Essential Elements of Lead Management 165
165
Four Links to Success 169
169
A Final Note 171
171
References 172
172
The Two Can Go Together 173
173
Our Primary Disciplinary Responsibilities 174
174
Causes of Student Misbehavior 176
176
Students Academic Needs 179
179
Early Intervention 210
210
Parental Involvement 215
215
The Social Organization of Schools 219
219
Two Syndromes Affecting AtRisk Youth 220
220
InSchool Diversion 223
223
Teacher Advisory Programs 227
227
Child Assistance Teams CAT 231
231
PushInNot Pullout Programs 232
232
A Case in Point 233
233
References 236
236
10 More Schoolwide Initiatives and a Vision of Restructuring 239
239
Expectations Should Fit the Individual 240
240
The Shopping Mall School 241
241
Curricular Diversity 242
242
StandardsBased Education 245
245
Necessary Ingredients for StandardsBased Education 248
248
Schoolwide Behavioral Expectations 250
250
Academic Standards and Authentic Testing 254
254
School Restructuring 266
266
MultiAged Grouping and the NonGraded School 267
267
A Secondary Restructuring Program 268
268
Concluding Comment 271
271
References 272
272
11 Evaluation of AtRisk Prevention Programs 273
273
A Timely and Rigorous Focus on Theory 274
274
Three Distinct Program Purposes From Chapter 1 275
275
The SixStage Process in Action 290
290
Summary 294
294
References 295
295
Epilogue 297
297
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About the author (2004)

Richard Sagor founded ISIE (pronounced "I see"), the Institute for the Study of Inquiry in Education, in 1997, to work with schools and educational organizations on the use of action research and data-based school improvement while he was a professor of educational leadership at Washington State University (WSU). Prior to joining the faculty at WSU, Sagor had 14 years of public school administrative experience, including service as an assistant superintendent, high school principal, instruction vice principal, disciplinary vice principal, and alternative school head teacher. He has taught the entire range of students, from the gifted to the learning disabled, in the areas of social studies, reading, and written composition. Educated in the public schools of New York, Sagor received his BA from New York University and two MA degrees as well as a PhD in Curriculum and Instruction from the University of Oregon. Beyond his work as a teacher and administrator, Sagor has had extensive international consulting experience. He served as a site visitor for the United States Department of Education's Secondary School Recognition Program and has worked with the Department of Defense's overseas schools, numerous state departments of education, and over 200 separate school districts across North America. His consulting has focused primarily on leadership development, the use of data with standards-based school improvement, collaborative action research, teacher motivation, and teaching at-risk youth. His articles on school reform and action research have received awards from the National Association of Secondary School Principals and the Educational Press Association of America. Sagor's books include The TQE Principal: A Transformed Leader; At-Risk Students: Reaching and Teaching Them; How To Conduct Collaborative Action Research; Local Control and Accountability: Getting it, Keeping it, and Improving School Performance; Guiding School Improvement With Action Research, and Motivating Students and Teachers in an Era of Standards.

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