Attitudes Toward Interactivity in a Graduate Distance Education Program: A Qualitative Analysis

Front Cover
Universal-Publishers, 1999 - Education - 108 pages
0 Reviews
As distance education schools grow in popularity, contemporary educators are raising important instructional questions about quality of these programs. A vital question involves concerns about the level of interactivity or interaction between students and between teachers and students. Interactivity is a challenging subject because there are few research studies that address the issue. It is a dynamic entity that involves a number of important elements, but the researcher stressed three vital elements: communication, participation, and feedback. The study highlights research results from a survey of students who were pursuing on-line graduate degrees (masters and doctoral). Important distance education issues are discussed such as feedback from professors and the quality of academic dialog during a computer-mediated class. The text offers a relevant analysis of interactivity that should help distance educators and administrators in their quest to develop programs that meet the needs of today═s adult learners.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Contents

INTRODUCTION
7
BACKGROUND
9
Adult Learning Theory
12
Interaction in Adult Education
14
Interactivity in Distance Education
15
PURPOSE OF THE STUDY
40
METHOD
42
Data Analysis
44
Assumptions and Limitations
61
Recommendations for Future Research
62
CONCLUSION
64
REFERENCES
65
APPENDIX A
73
APPENDIX B
74
APPENDIX C
75
APPENDIX D
76

RESULTS
47
DISCUSSION
59
APPENDIX E
77
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 72 - Competence in teaching at a distance. In TE Cyrs (Ed.), Teaching and learning at a distance: What it takes to effectively design, deliver, and evaluate programs. New Directions for Teaching a ml I .fuming, 71, 15—18.
Page 66 - Bullen, M. (1997). A case study of participation and critical thinking in a university-level course delivered by computer conferencing. Unpublished PhD Thesis: University of British Columbia.

References to this book

All Book Search results »

Bibliographic information