Attitudes And Persuasion: Classic And Contemporary Approaches

Front Cover
Westview Press, Jan 26, 1996 - Psychology - 336 pages
1 Review
This classic text surveys a number of different theoretical approaches to the related phenomena of attitude and belief change. These theories are grouped into seven major approaches, each presented and evaluated in a separate chapter. Each contributes in an important way to a complete understanding of the persuasion process. Appropriate for both upper level undergraduates and graduates in the social sciences.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

This book is amazing! It is definitely a book that will take years to digest. There are many times where sentences and paragraphs must be read over and over to comprehend the findings. This book is the Elixir of Egypt.

Selected pages

Contents

Introduction
3
Do Attitudes Predict Behaviors?
22
How Is Attitude Change Studied
29
The Approaches to Persuasion
35
Demand Characteristics
43
Twofactor Theory of Verbal
49
Evaluation
56
Message Factors
69
Necessary Conditions
145
Impression Management Theory
152
16O Retrospective
160
Attributional
163
Overjustification Effects
169
Effects of Bogus Physiological
175
Combinatory
183
The Theory of Reasoned Action
193

8O Recipient Factors
80
The Persistence of Attitude
87
Retrospective
93
The Social Judgment
99
Communication Discrepancy
105
Indirect Influence
115
Motivational
125
Congruity Theory
133
Effect of Disconfirming
139
2OO Summary of the Theory
200
Retrospective
211
Premessage inductions That
226
A General
255
The Elaboration Likelihood
262
References
271
Author index 3O 1
301
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 6 - Persuasion is achieved by the speaker's personal character when the speech is so spoken as to make us think him credible. We believe good men more fully and more readily than others: this is true generally whatever the question is, and absolutely true where exact certainty is impossible and opinions are divided.
Page 23 - Taken as a whole, these studies suggest that it is considerably more likely that attitudes will be unrelated or only slightly related to overt behaviors than that attitudes will be closely related to actions.
Page 5 - Of the modes of persuasion furnished by the spoken word there are three kinds. The first kind depends on the personal character of the speaker; the second on putting the audience into a certain frame of mind; the third on the proof, or apparent proof, provided by the words of the speech itself.
Page 6 - Thirdly, persuasion is effected through the speech itself when we have proved a truth or an apparent truth by means of the persuasive arguments suitable to the case in question.
Page 69 - Soc. And what would you consider this to be? Gor. What is there greater than the word which persuades the judges in the courts, or the senators in the council, or the citizens in the assembly, or at any other political meeting? — if you have the power of uttering this word, you will have the physician your slave, and the trainer your slave, and the money-maker of whom you talk will be found to gather treasures, not for himself, but for you who are able to speak and to persuade the multitude.

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (1996)

Richard E. Petty and John T. Cacioppo are professors of psychology at Ohio State University.

Bibliographic information