Audubon: Life and Art in the American Wilderness

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Villard Books, 1993 - Science - 407 pages
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Inspired by the primeval forests and the vast flocks of birds that thrived in them, Audubon spent several decades of his life painstakingly documenting the birds of the American wilderness. He traveled the back roads and bayous, searching out and studying the birds that were his pastime and passion. He spent long, silent hours observing them in the wild. He was no amateur ornithologist; rather, he drew his birds from life, and his work always carried the line "drawn from nature by J. J. Audubon". Combining meticulous scholarship with the dramatic life story of a naturalist and pioneer, Audubon reexamines the artist's journals and letters in the first new biography of Audubon to come out in almost thirty years. The life of John James Audubon is not only the story of one artist's quest but also a meditation on the origins of the American spirit and the sacrifice that resulted in one of the world's greatest bodies of art: The Birds of America.

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Audubon: life and art in the American wilderness

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Popular biographies of John James Audubon have generally been either too worshipful or too condemning; Streshinsky, best known as a novelist (e.g., The Shores of Paradise , Putnam, 1991), has taken a ... Read full review

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