Narrating the Holocaust

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A&C Black, Sep 13, 2000 - Religion - 311 pages
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Few Holocaust survivors attach any meaning to camp life itself. Yet, most agree that the difficulties of coping with the misery and its lingering memories were eased if some purpose - whether in the form of physical or psychological resistance or of hope for a future life, reunited with their loved ones - could be found. Many survivors turned to writing about their experiences.Reiter shows how survivors who were professional authors adapted certain literary genres, while non-professional writers-the vast majority-related their experiences in report form. A comparison between these memoirs and the more frequently discussed camp novels identifies the different narrative strategies.
 

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Contents

Communication
11
Genre
50
Coming to terms with experience through language
84
The narrative of lived reality
135
from experience to report
197
Summary
227
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Trauma Fiction
Anne Whitehead
No preview available - 2004
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About the author (2000)

Andrea Reiter is a Research Fellow at the School of Modern Languages, Univeristy of Southampton, UK.

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