August Zang and the French Croissant: How Viennoiserie Came to France

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Chez Jim, 2009 - Cooking - 94 pages
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Yes an Austrian brought the croissant to France. But it wasn't Marie-Antoinette. Half a century after her time, an Austrian officer opened a bakery in Paris which became the place to go. The Boulangerie Viennoise introduced Viennese techniques which would one day lead to the baguette, and was known for its Viennese loaves and its kipfel - small rolls in the shape of a crescent. Or, as the French say, croissant. August Zang didn't stay long - having brought "viennoiserie" to France, he went back to Vienna to found the newspaper 'Die Presse', and with it, the modern Austrian daily press. This work discusses the history of the kipfel, why two common tales about the croissant are myths, how the Boulangerie was started and its influence on French baking, and August Zang's subsequent career. This second edition includes a closer look at the rue de Richelieu in the nineteenth century and at Viennese baked goods in general, an expanded analysis of Zang's innovations and influence, a glance at the changes in bakery decor and revised overviews of the baguette and the changes in the croissant, as well as additional mentions of Zang in the American press.
 

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Contents

August Zang and the French Croissant
1
The Kipfel
3
Croissant Myths
9
MarieAntoinette
11
Enter The Croissant
13
August Zang Baker
15
The Boulangerie Viennoise
16
Innovations
30
The Baguette
43
Towards the Modern Croissant
51
The Father of the Daily Vienna Press
55
Girardin
56
Die Presse
57
Zang the Man
60
After Die Presse
63
The WellBread Count
64

Zangs Influence
37
Elegance and Upgrades
39
Meanwhile Back in Paris
69
Copyright

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About the author (2009)

Jim Chevallier's essay on the French eighteenth century breakfast is included in "Consuming Culture in the Long Nineteenth Century." His historical cookbooks include "How to Cook a Peacock" (a translation of Taillevent's medieval "Viandier") and two volumes in the "Apres Moi Le Dessert' series (both collections of French eighteenth century recipes).

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