Augustine: Political Writings

Front Cover
Cambridge University Press, Jan 11, 2001 - History - 299 pages
0 Reviews
This collection brings together thirty-five letters and sermons of Augustine, Bishop of Hippo from 396-430 AD, that deal with political matters. The letters and sermons are both practical and principled and treat many essential themes in Augustine's thought, including the responsibilities of citizenship, the relationship between the church and secular authority, religious coercion, and war and peace. These texts complement Augustine's classic The City of God, and give students direct insight into the political and social world of late antiquity with which Augustine was immediately involved.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Editorsnote pageix
ix
Translators notes xx viii
xxviii
Bibliography
xli
Augustine to Nectarius 408409
2
Augustine to Paulinus of Nola and Therasia 408
22
Augustine to Alypius 428
43
Augustine to Marcellinus 411
61
Augustine to Apringius 411
63
Augustine to Crispin 401
132
Augustine to Caecilian 406409
134
Augustine to Emeritus 405411
136
Clergy of Hippo Regius to Januarius 406408
144
Augustine to Donatus 411414
157
Augustine to Dulcitius 419
159
Augustine to the Donatists 409410
163
Augustine to Boniface c 417
173

Augustine to Marcellinus 411412
67
Macedonius to Augustine 413414
70
Augustine to Macedonius 413414
71
Macedonius to Augustine 413414
88
Augustine to Macedonius 413414
89
JUDICIAL AUTHORITY Commentary on the gospel of John 33 419421
101
On the feast of St Laurence
107
On the words of Psalm 2 10
119
THE DONATIST CONTROVERSY
127
Augustine to Crispin 400
128
The sacking of the city of Rome 410411
205
Augustine to Boniface 417
214
Augustine to Boniface 428
219
Augustine to Darius 429430
225
Biographical notes
227
Notes to the text
251
Index of persons and places
293
Index of topics
296
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2001)

Saint Augustine was born to a Catholic mother and a pagan father on November 13, 354, at Thagaste, near Algiers. He studied Latin literature and later taught rhetoric in Rome and Milan. He originally joined the Manicheans, a religious sect, but grew unhappy with some of their philosophies. After his conversion to Christianity and his baptism in 387, Augustine developed his own approach to philosophy and theology, accommodating a variety of methods and different perspectives. He believed that the grace of Christ was indispensable to human freedom, and he framed the concepts of original sin and just war. His thoughts greatly influenced the medieval worldview. One of Augustine's major goals was a single, unified church. He was ordained a priest in 391 and appointed Bishop of Hippo, in Roman Africa, in 396. Augustine was one of the most prolific Latin authors in terms of surviving works, and the list of his works consists of more than one hundred separate titles. His writings and arguments with other sects include the Donatists and the Pelagians. On the Trinity, The City of God, and On Nature and Grace are some of his important writings. Confessions, which is considered his masterpiece, is an autobiographical work that recounts his restless youth and details the spiritual experiences that led him to Christianity. Many of Augustine's ideas, such as those concerning sin and predestination, became integral to the doctrines of the Roman Catholic Church. In the Catholic Church he is a saint and pre-eminent Doctor of the Church, and the patron of the Augustinians. He is the patron saint of brewers, printers, and theologians. Augustine died on August 28, 430.

Bibliographic information