Augustine of Hippo, Selected Writings

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Paulist Press, 1984 - Religion - 514 pages
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Selections from the writings of one of the most influential shapers of the western theological tradition, Augustine of Hippo (354-430), including On the Trinity, The Rule of St. Augustine, The Happy Life, On the Presence of God and other works.
 

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Difficult reading. I had not heard of all the books from which this anthology was drawn, but I had heard of several. As a result, I was glad to be able to read several passages in context. This included the famous conversion passage from Confessions.
I found City of God interesting, because I had not realized that Augustine proposed two cities, the other being a city of the devil, much in the manner of the wheat and the tares which grow up together but are finally separated at the Judgment.
I also found the Rule of Augustine interesting. In light of the recent Barna poll in which only 5% of evangelicals said they were help accountable by their churches, we would all do well to consider how we might hold one another accountable in Christian community.
Finally, while reading this volume I did some pondering on whether the Founding Fathers thought of the Pursuit of Happiness in spiritual terms rather than in secular terms, particularly since they considered this a God-given right. If so, then the pursuit of happiness is not that which contributes most to my personal pleasure today but rather that which will result in eternal bliss with the Savior, Jesus Christ.
 

Contents

CONFESSIONS
55
Book Seven
59
Book Eight
80
Book Nine
100
Book Ten
122
THE HAPPY LIFE
163
HOMILIES ON THE PSALMS
195
The Ascents of the Christian
199
Treatise Seven
299
ON THE TRINITY
309
Book Eight
313
Book Fourteen
331
ON SEEING GOD ON THE PRESENCE OF GOD
361
Augustine to the Noble Lady Pauline greeting
365
On the Presence of God
403
THE CITY OF GOD
427

Our Confidence in the Lord
213
The Ecstasy of Love
231
God Is True Wealth
248
HOMILIES ON THE GOSPEL OF ST JOHN
263
First Homily
267
Twelfth Homily
281
THE FIRST EPISTLE OF ST JOHN
295
Book Nineteen
433
THE RULE OF ST AUGUSTINE
479
Selected Bibliography
495
Indexes
501
Index to Texts
505
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Page 27 - Wherefore also God highly exalted him, and gave unto him the name which is above every name ; that in the name of Jesus every knee should bow, of things in heaven and things on earth and things under the earth, and that every tongue should confess that Jesus Christ is Lord, to the glory of God the Father.
Page 73 - Let them praise the name of the Lord: for his name alone is excellent; his glory is above the earth and heaven.
Page 73 - Praise the Lord from the earth, ye dragons and all deeps: Fire, and hail; snow, and vapours: stormy wind fulfilling his word: Mountains, and all hills; fruitful trees, and all cedars: Beasts, and all cattle; creeping things, and flying fowl...
Page 29 - If the Spirit of him who raised Jesus from the dead dwells in you, he who raised Christ Jesus from the dead will give life to your mortal bodies also through his Spirit which dwells in you.

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About the author (1984)

Saint Augustine was born to a Catholic mother and a pagan father on November 13, 354, at Thagaste, near Algiers. He studied Latin literature and later taught rhetoric in Rome and Milan. He originally joined the Manicheans, a religious sect, but grew unhappy with some of their philosophies. After his conversion to Christianity and his baptism in 387, Augustine developed his own approach to philosophy and theology, accommodating a variety of methods and different perspectives. He believed that the grace of Christ was indispensable to human freedom, and he framed the concepts of original sin and just war. His thoughts greatly influenced the medieval worldview. One of Augustine's major goals was a single, unified church. He was ordained a priest in 391 and appointed Bishop of Hippo, in Roman Africa, in 396. Augustine was one of the most prolific Latin authors in terms of surviving works, and the list of his works consists of more than one hundred separate titles. His writings and arguments with other sects include the Donatists and the Pelagians. On the Trinity, The City of God, and On Nature and Grace are some of his important writings. Confessions, which is considered his masterpiece, is an autobiographical work that recounts his restless youth and details the spiritual experiences that led him to Christianity. Many of Augustine's ideas, such as those concerning sin and predestination, became integral to the doctrines of the Roman Catholic Church. In the Catholic Church he is a saint and pre-eminent Doctor of the Church, and the patron of the Augustinians. He is the patron saint of brewers, printers, and theologians. Augustine died on August 28, 430.

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