Aunt Mary's tales: for the entertainment and improvement of little boys : addressed to her nephews

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O.A. Roorbach, 68 Water-street, 1827 - Boys - 174 pages
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Page 36 - ... make white people bleed plentifully through their stockings. Neither can we let a building stand, so as to get a view of the interior parts without interruption ; for, while the soldiers are defending the outworks, the labourers keep barricading all the way against us, stopping up the different galleries and passages which lead to the various apartments, particularly the royal chamber, all the entrances to which they fill...
Page 35 - the labourers run into the many pipes and galleries with which the building is perforated, which they do so quickly, that they seem to vanish; for, in a few seconds all are gone, and the soldiers rush out as numerous and as vindictive as before. On finding no enemy, they return again leisurely into the hill; and...
Page 33 - When they attack the leg, the stain of blood upon the stocking extends more than an inch in width. They make their hooked jaws meet at the first stroke, and never quit their hold, but will suffer themselves to be pulled away piece after piece, without any attempt to escape.
Page 29 - The inferior building, or assemblage of nurseries, chambers, and passages, has a flattish roof without any perforation. By this contrivance, if, by accident, water should penetrate the external dome, the apartments below are preserved from injury.
Page 25 - These apartments are joined by the magazines and nurseries. The magazines are chambers of clay, and are at all times well stored with provisions, which, to the naked eye, seem to consist of the raspings of wood and plants which the...
Page 36 - ... one order never attempts to fight, nor the other to work, let the emergency be ever so great. The obstinacy of the soldiers is remarkable : they fight to the very last, disputing every inch of ground so well, as often to drive away the negroes, who are without shoes, and make white people bleed plentifully through their stockings.
Page 32 - When a breach is made in one of the walls by an ax, or other instrument, the first object that attracts attention is the behaviour of the soldiers or fighting insects. Immediately after the blow is given, a soldier comes out, walks about the breach, and seems to examine the nature of the enemy, or the cause of the attack. He then goes into the hill, gives the alarm, and in a short time large bodies rush out as fast as the breach will permit. It is not easy to describe the fury that actuates these...
Page 28 - These apartments compose an intricate labyrinth, which extends a foot or more in diameter from the royal chamber on every side. Here the nurseries and magazines of provisions begin ; and, being separated by small empty chambers and galleries, which surround them, and communicate with each other, are continued on all sides to the outward shell, and reach up within...
Page 29 - The area has also a flatfish floor, which is situated above the royal chamber. It is likewise water-proof, and so constructed, that if water gets admittance it runs off by subterraneous passages, which are of an astonishing magnitude. " I measured one of them," says Mr. Smeathman, " which was perfectly cylindrical, and thirteen inches in diameter.
Page 35 - the labourers run into the many pipes and galleries with which the building is perforated, which they do so quickly that they seem to vanish ; for in a few seconds all are gone, and the soldiers rush out as numerous and as vindictive as before. On finding no enemy, they return again, leisurely, into the hill ; and, very soon...

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