Aural Images of Lost Traditions: Sharps and Flats in the Sixteenth Century

Front Cover
University of Toronto Press, 1992 - Music - 199 pages
0 Reviews
Twentieth-century musicians endeavouring to re-create the music of earlier periods face a variety of challenges. Robert Toft addresses one of these: in the sixteenth century, sharps and flats were rarely notated in the sources of vocal music. Singers were expected to be familiar with the principles governing the application of these signs and to make the appropriate alterations themselves. Through a comparative study of vocal sources, intabulations of vocal music (instrumental transliterations which specify all pitches unambiguously), and theoretical treatises, Toft documents the range of theoretical possibilities open to the performer and indicates which sharps and flats practising musicians actually incorporated in their performances. Thus, one of the thorniest problems performers and editors of Renaissance vocal music face is discussed in the widest context possible, allowing oral traditions which sixteenth-century vocal notation only partly records to be revealed.

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

PitchContent in Josquins Motets
41
The German Custom
95
Conclusion
131
NOTES
151
GLOSSARY
167
LiST OF EXAMPLES
187
Copyright

About the author (1992)

is a member of the Department of Music, University of Wateloo

Bibliographic information