Australia's Muslim Cameleers: Pioneers of the Inland 1860s-1930s

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Wakefield Press, 2007 - Afghans - 8 pages
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"This book is about the often-forgotten Muslim cameleers, known as 'Afghans', who came to Australia between the 1860s and the 1930s to ply Australia's inland routes. It was realised that camels were far more efficient and able to carry heavy loads in the harsh conditions of inland Australia than horses and bullock-teams. The camels needed expert 'drivers' to guide them. These pioneering cameleers became an integral part of the exploration and transportation systems in arid Australia. Many were Muslim, but they did not come to spread Islam. Rather, they constructed small mosques in outback Australian towns, and later the larger cities, and quietly kept to themselves. This book is about how the cameleers have been largely forgotten by history and asks why." -- Provided by publisher.
 

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Contents

Foreword
7
Australias early Muslim settlements Anna Kenny
17
Who were the cameleers?
25
To Australia with camels
35
With the explorers
49
Nosepegs hobbles and bells
68
Packsaddles
74
Contractors to entrepreneurs
82
Stations townships and mines
96
hawkers
102
The cameleers and Aboriginal people
108
Life in camel camps and townships
121
Pioneers or aliens?
133
Representation and memory
148
Acknowledgements
160
A biographical listing of Australias Muslim cameleers
166

Carrving wool
90

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