Australian Cinema After Mabo

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Cambridge University Press, Oct 27, 2004 - Performing Arts - 204 pages
Australian Cinema after Mabo is a comprehensive 2005 study of Australian national cinema in the 1990s. Using the 1992 Mabo decision as a starting point, it looks at how the Mabo decision, where the founding doctrine of terra nullius was overruled, has destabilised the way Australians relate to the land. It asks how we think about Australian cinema in the post Mabo era, and what part it plays in the national process of reviewing our colonial past and the ways in which settlers and indigenous cultures can co-exist. Including The Tracker, Kiss or Kill, The Castle, Love Serenade and Yolngu Boy among numerous others, this book highlights turning points in the shaping of the Australian cinema since Mabo. It is essential reading for anyone studying Australian cinema and for those interested in the ways in which land politics has impacted upon the way we imagine ourselves through cinema.
 

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Contents

Backtracking after Mabo
5
Home and Abroad in Moulin Rouge The Dish and Lantana
24
Elites and Battlers in Australian Rules and Walking on Water
43
Mediating Memory in Mabo Life of an Island Man
61
Aftershock and the Desert Landscape in Heavens Burning The Last Days of Chez Nous Holy Smoke Serenades Yolngu Boy The Missing
77
Coming from the Country in Heartland Cunnamulla and Message from Moree
96
Coming from the City in The Castle Vacant Possession Strange Planet and Radiance
114
Lost Stolen and Found in RabbitProof Fence
135
Escaping History and Shame in Looking for Alibrandi Head On and Beneath Clouds
154
Sustaining Grief in Japanese Story and Dreaming in Motion
174
Bibliography
190
Index
202
Copyright

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Page 189 - Cathy Caruth, Trauma: Explorations in Memory (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1995), 4.
Page 188 - Where is the love? The paradox of performing loneliness in Ts'ai Ming-Liang's Vive L'Amour'. In Lesley Stern and George Kouvaros (eds), Falling For You: Essays on Cinema and Performance, Sydney: Power, 1999, pp.

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