Australian Cruise Ships

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Rosenberg Publishing, Jan 1, 2007 - History - 112 pages
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During the past thirty years cruising has become a popular form of holiday for an increasing number of Australians. The first cruise from Australia was operated by the P&O liner Strathaird, which departed Sydney on 23 December 1932 for five nights to Brisbane and Norfolk Island. Up to 1939 P & O and Orient Line vessels operated occasional cruises between line voyages from Britain, but these ceased in 1939. It was not until the mid-1950s that cruises began operating again, but these were still on a very occasional basis, again on P & O and Orient Line vessels engaged in the regular trade between Britain and Australia. During the 1960s other shipping companies also began operating occasional cruises, but there were no ships assigned to the cruise trade on a regular basis. Things began to change in the early 1970s, when the advent of the Boeing 747 transformed international travel. Instead of spending four weeks or more at sea, Australians could now fly to Britain and Europe in one day, and this spelled doom for the long-haul passenger liner. Many of these vessel ended up in the scrap yard, but some were refitted to full time cruise ships, and thus began the cruise boom. The first liners to be engaged in full time cruising from Australia were all converted, having been built for other trades. For many thousands of Australians, these ships introduced them to the delights of cruising, and the number of Australians making a cruise has steadily increased over the past three decades. This book provides details of many of the ships that cruised out of Australian ports from the early 1970s up to 2000, and all the cruise liners to have been seen in local waters since 2001, as well as a look ahead to the liners scheduled to come here later in 2007 and into 2008. It is my hope that turning the pages of this book will bring back many happy memories to cruise travellers, and hopefully inspire those who have not yet ventured out to sea to make the plunge and discover the joy of cruising. The ships are listed in the order in which they entered the local cruise market. As the pages proceed it will be noted that over the years the size of the liners seen in Australia has steadily increased. In the early days cruise liners were usually no more than 25,000 gross tons, but in the summer of 2002 we welcomed the first liner to exceed 100,000 gross tons. In February 2007 the second largest passenger liner ever built, Queen Mary 2, will make a visit to our shores. For the summer of 2007-08, the Australian cruise trade will be serviced by three liners exceeding 70,000 gross tons, something that would have been thought impossible even five years ago. This book includes 110 liners that have operated cruises in Australia waters over the past 35 years. The text gives full details, including important dates, types of accommodation, interesting facts and general information, on every ship. There is also a colour picture on every page, none of which have been published previously as they are all taken by the author or his friends in the shipping fraternity.
 

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About the author (2007)

Peter Plowman is a noted maritime researcher and writer, having had five books published in Australia over the past twenty years. His first books detailed the history of Australian and New Zealand Passenger Ships from 1875 to 1980.

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