Authentic copies of the instructions given by general Hoche to colonel Tate previous to his landing on the coast of south Wales in 1797

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1708
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Page 10 - Bristol which may be to windward, and immediately to set fire to that quarter. If the enterprize be conducted with dexterity, it cannot fail to produce the total ruin of the town, the port, the docks, and the vessels, and to strike terror and amazement into the very heart of the capital of England.
Page 16 - There is another object which should likewise decide you to enter those counties, as you will be joined there by two other columns of French troops, to which you will unite that under your command, if the general commanding the expedition in chief shall desire it.
Page 16 - ... and intelligence combined, you may easily possess yourself of Chester or Liverpool, which you will ruin by burning the magazines, and filling up the ports, or at least you may cut off all communication between those cities and the interior. There is another object which should likewise decide you to enter...
Page 9 - La Seconde Legion des Francs.' " The legion is completely armed ; he will be likewise furnished with fast-going vessels with which he is to proceed, before, with, or after the squadron ; the vessels will be victualled for the passage, but the legion will bring on shore nothing but their ammunition, which is to be musquet cartridges.
Page 12 - ... and workmen, of vagabonds and idlers, and even of malefactors; but especial care must be taken not to incorporate them into the legion; they are to be formed into new companies, commanded by French officers, and to the end that the natives may not be acquainted with the force employed, these companies are to be kept asunder and in ignorance of the details as far as circumstances will permit; it is principally by these new formed companies that the insurrection is to be forwarded. The commerce...
Page 12 - ... of the English people, they have still a respect for the laws and their magistrates, even in the moment of insurrection; it will be therefore advisable to spare, as much as possible, the property of those who may be in any civil function, and even of the country gentlemen; all...
Page 13 - The commerce of the enemy in the country is to be interrupted by breaking down bridges, cutting of dykes, and ruining causeways, which is, at the same time, essentially necessary for the preservation of the army ; by plundering all convoys of subsistence, the public stages and waggons, and even private carriages ; the cutting off the supplies of provisions from the principal towns, burning all vessels and boats in...
Page 11 - ... days, and a double ration of wine or brandy, to recruit them after the fatigues of the voyage. " Not a moment is to be lost in the debarkation, and the soldiers must carry their ammunition and provisions until they can secure bat...
Page 9 - ... which he is to proceed, before, with, or after the squadron; the vessels will be victualled for the passage, but the legion will bring on shore nothing but their ammunition, which is to be musquet cartridges. Col. Tate is to have the command in chief of the legion; the Admiral will give the necessary orders to the officer commanding the naval force, which will proceed up St. George's Channel, and the landing is to be effectuated, if possible, in or near Cardigan Bay.
Page 10 - Bristol, which is the second city in England for riches and commerce; the destruction of Bristol is of the very last importance, and every possible effort should be made to accomplish it. For this purpose, it will be proper to reconnoitre the mouth of the Severn, in the day time, and to sail up the Avon at night fall, within five miles of the town, where the landing should be made, on the right bank, in the greatest silence, and, the troops, being supplied with combustible matter, Col. Tate is to...

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