Autobiographical Recollections of Sir John Bowring, Volume 2

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H.S. King, 1843 - Authors, English - 404 pages
 

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Wrong title. The scanned book is the correspondence of John, the 4th Duke of Bedford. It has nothing whatsoever to do with John Bowring

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Page 190 - He made an administration so checkered and speckled ; he put together a piece of joinery so crossly indented and whimsically dovetailed, a cabinet so variously inlaid, such a piece of diversified mosaic, such a tesselated pavement without cement, — here a bit of black stone, and there a bit of white, patriots and courtiers, king's friends and republicans, whigs and tories, treacherous friends and open enemies, — that it was indeed a very curious show, but utterly unsafe to touch, and unsure to...
Page 190 - ... a cabinet so variously inlaid; such a piece of diversified Mosaic ; such a tesselated pavement Without cement ; here a bit of black stone, and there a bit of white ; patriots and courtiers, king's friends and republicans ; whigs and tories ; treacherous friends and open enemies : that it was indeed a very curious show 5 but utterly unsafe to touch, and unsure to stand on.
Page 127 - Silence, ye wolves ! while Ralph to Cynthia howls And makes night hideous — Answer him, ye owls ! " Sense, speech, and measure, living tongues and dead, Let all give way, and Morris may be read.
Page 424 - ... said Bute ; and early, in January, 1Y61, his friends urged him " to put himself at the head, in a great office of business, and to take the lead.
Page 312 - Majesty's information the names of such persons, if any such shall occur to me, as shall be most capable and best qualified, from their abilities, credit, and connections, to strengthen and promote his Majesty's service. As it is absolutely necessary, to enable me to be of any service to the King in this country, that the secret despatches which are to come from you to me be kept inviolably so, I must most earnestly entreat that the contents of them may not be sent to individuals here, as the present...
Page 189 - He made an administration, so checkered and speckled; he put together a piece of joinery, so crossly indented and whimsically dove-tailed; a cabinet so variously inlaid; such a piece of diversified Mosaic; such a tesselated pavement without cement; here a bit of black stone, and there a bit of white; patriots and courtiers, king's friends and republicans; whigs and tories; treacherous friends and open enemies : that it was indeed...
Page 187 - Delaval had spoken pompously and abusively against the petition, and had thrown the house into a laughter on the topics of bribery and corruption. Pitt, who was in the gallery, started, and came down with impetuosity, and with all his former fire said, ' He had asked what occasioned such an uproar : lamented to hear a laugh on such a subject as bribery ! Did we try within the house to diminish our own dignity, when such attacks were made upon it from without?
Page 400 - ... of such a scandalous and iniquitous business, which continues here to be viewed in the same light, and to stand the object of public animadversion. " It is with great concern I observe, your Grace thinks there is cause to consider any one class of Presbyterians in Ireland as averse to English government, and therefore at least, equally with Papists, to be guarded against. I am not very particularly acquainted with the distinctive tenets of the sect among them mentioned by your Grace, but it highly...
Page xix - ... royal person and government against all invaders whatsoever; that they should be always ready to concur in such measures, and to act such parts in defence of the kingdom,, in common with the rest of his majesty's subjects, as his grace in his great wisdom should be pleased to appoint; and think themselves particularly happy to be under the direction and command of so known an assertor of liberty, such an important and distinguished governor. Finally, they expressed the most earnest wish, that...
Page 187 - This thunderbolt thrown in a sky so long serene, confounded the audience. Murray crouched silent and terrified. Legge scarce rose to say with great humility, ' that he had been raised solely by the Whigs, and if he fell sooner or later, he should pride himself in nothing but in being a Whig.

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