Autobiography, Letters and Literary Remains of Mrs. Piozzi (Thrale), Volume 1

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Ticknor and Fields, 1861 - Authors, English - 531 pages
 

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Page 237 - Live while you live, the Epicure would say, And seize the pleasures of the present day. Live while you live, the sacred Preacher cries, And give to God each moment as it flies.
Page 328 - New sorrow rises as the day returns, A sister sickens, or a daughter mourns. Now kindred Merit fills the sable bier, Now lacerated Friendship claims a tear; Year chases year, decay pursues decay, Still drops some joy from with'ring life away; New forms arise, and...
Page 246 - tis monstrous hard; Besides, in truth, I'm not prepared: My thoughts on other matters go, This is my wedding night, you know, What more he urged I have not heard, His reasons could not well be stronger, So Death the poor delinquent spared, And left to live a little longer. Yet calling up a serious look, His hour-glass trembled while he spoke, Neighbor, he said, farewell.
Page 477 - On some fond breast the parting soul relies, Some pious drops the closing eye requires; E'en from the tomb the voice of Nature cries, E'en in our ashes live their wonted fires. For thee, who, mindful of th...
Page 11 - See LEVET to the grave descend; Officious, innocent, sincere, Of every friendless name the friend. Yet still he fills affection's eye, Obscurely wise, and coarsely kind; Nor, letter'd arrogance, deny Thy praise to merit unrefin'd.
Page 246 - I'll quit my prey, And grant a kind reprieve ; In hopes you'll have no more to say ; But, when I call again this way, Well pleased the world will leave.
Page 247 - Each strives your sadness to amuse; I warrant you hear all the news.
Page 48 - England and France affords a man. But when he wished to point them out to his companion: "Never heed such nonsense," would be the reply; "a blade of grass is always a blade of grass, whether in one country or another. Let us, if we DO talk, talk about something; men and women are my subjects of inquiry; let us see how these differ from those we have left behind.
Page 92 - Johnson told me, that he went up thither without mentioning it to his servant, when he wanted to study, secure from interruption ; for he would not allow his servant to say he was not at home when he really was. ' A servant's strict regard for truth, (said he) must be weakened by such a practice.
Page 134 - ... and as it was not in his power to come to me, begging that I would come to him as soon as possible. I sent him a guinea, and promised to come to him directly.

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