Autobiography of Josiah Henson: An Inspiration for Harriet Beecher Stowe's Uncle Tom

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Courier Corporation, 2003 - Biography & Autobiography - 190 pages
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Heartening, firsthand account by the man widely regarded as the person who provided much of the material for the self-sacrificing, revered character in Uncle Tom's Cabin. Henson perceptively recalls his childhood and youth, forced separation from his wife and children, escape to Canada, role as "conductor" on the Underground Railroad, and meeting with Queen Victoria in England. Additional comments on fugitive slaves enlisting in the Union Army and Henson's brief return after the Civil War to his old home in Maryland. Invaluable resource for students and teachers of Southern and African-American history, and anyone devoted to the struggle for racial equality.
 

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Contents

MY BIRTH AND CHILDHOOD
13
MY FIRST GREAT TRIAL
16
MY BOYHOOD AND YOUTH
19
MY CONVERSION
23
MAIMED FOR LIFE
27
A RESPONSIBLE JOURNEY
32
A NEW HOME
38
RETURN TO MARYLAND
43
LUMBERING OPERATIONS
93
VISIT TO ENGLAND
96
THE WORLDS FAIR IN LONDON
100
VISITS TO THE RAGGED SCHOOLS
103
CLOSING UP MY LONDON AGENCY
107
MY BROTHERS FREEDOM
110
MRS STOWES CHARACTERS
113
THE MANUAL LABOUR SCHOOL AT DAWN
119

TAKEN SOUTH AWAY FROM WIFE AND CHILDREN
49
A TERRIBLE TEMPTATION
52
PROVIDENTIAL DELIVERANCE
55
ESCAPE FROM BONDAGE
59
JOURNEY TO CANADA
64
NEW SCENES AND A NEW HOME
71
LIFE IN CANADA
76
CONDUCTING SLAVES TO CANADA
79
SECOND JOURNEY ON THE UNDERGROUND RAILROAD
82
HOME AT DAWN
89
IDOLS SHATTERED
125
FUGITIVE SLAVESENLISTING IN THE STATES
128
EARLY ASPIRATIONS CHECKED
135
MY FAMILY
142
MY THIRD AND LAST VISIT TO LONDON
147
UNCLE TOM AND THE EDITORS VISIT TO HER MAJESTY THE QUEEN
151
MY VISIT TO MY OLD HOME IN MARYLAND
157
CONCLUSION
162
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About the author (2003)

1789-1883

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