Autonomous Agents: From Self-Control to Autonomy

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Oxford University Press, Aug 3, 1995 - Philosophy - 288 pages
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This book addresses two related topics: self-control and individual autonomy. In approaching these issues, Mele develops a conception of an ideally self-controlled person, and argues that even such a person can fall short of personal autonomy. He then examines what needs to be added to such a person to yield an autonomous agent and develops two overlapping answers: one for compatibilist believers in human autonomy and one for incompatibilists. While remaining neutral between those who hold that autonomy is compatible with determinism and those who deny this, Mele shows that belief that there are autonomous agents is better grounded than belief that there are not.
 

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Contents

Introduction SelfControl and Personal Autonomy
3
Better Judgment Nature and Function
15
Exercising SelfControl A Motivational Problem
32
SelfControl Akrasia and SecondOrder Desires
59
SelfControl and Belief
86
SelfControl Akrasia and Emotion
102
The Upper Reaches of SelfControl and the Ideally SelfControlled Person
112
PART II
129
Psychological Autonomy and Personal History
144
Compatibilist Autonomy and Autonomous Action
177
Problems for Libertarians
195
Incompatibilist Autonomy and Autonomous Action
211
Assessing the Denial of Autonomy
237
References
257
Index
265
Copyright

Transition From SelfControl to Autonomy
131

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