Autonomy and Social Interaction

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SUNY Press, Aug 14, 1990 - Philosophy - 224 pages
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This book makes a distinctive contribution to the growing discussion of autonomy. As the ability to determine one’s life in both thought and action, autonomy is foundational among our many and varied values. Other philosophical treatments tend to emphasize the significance of autonomy for moral theory or institutional arrangements such as legal, political, or economic power structures. Kupfer, however, focuses on the context of social relations and interactions in which autonomous living occurs. He handles autonomy and social interaction reciprocally, so that the significance of each for the other is drawn out. In addition, key themes are threaded throughout, such as the nature of dependency, self-concept and self-knowledge, and authority.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
Autonomy Dimensions and Distinctions Conditions and Constraints
9
Respect and Autonomy
39
Lying and Loss of Autonomy
61
Parents and Children Obligation and Friendship
83
Privacy Autonomy and SelfConcept
123
Building Autonomous Places
149
Conclusion
183
Notes
187
Index
213
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About the author (1990)

Joseph H. Kupfer is Professor of Philosophy at Iowa State University. He is the author of Experience as Art: Aesthetics in Everyday Life, also published by SUNY Press.

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