Ba Gua: Hidden Knowledge in the Taoist Internal Martial Art

Front Cover
North Atlantic Books, 1998 - Health & Fitness - 138 pages
3 Reviews
The Taoist yogic discipline of Ba Gua is an internal form of the ancient art of kung fu--as are the much older t'ai chi and Xing I. Ba Gua is the most arcane and yogic of three sister arts--t'ai chi and Xing I are the others--and is distinguished by serpentine turning and circling momvements and its own internal energy exercises, Ba Gua Qi Gong.
 

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An amazing and inspiring book. I practiced Bagua some years ago, but left the study because of life events. I am so glad that I found this book and bought it.
I was re-inspired and have since found a small bagua group to practice with nearby. Highly recommended.
Jon Z.

Review BA GUA Hidden Knowledge in the Taoist

User Review  - quietwarriorxx1806 - Overstock.com

Very entertaining and well written. I especially like the ideas delivered on the qualities of using Yin and Yang energies within the art of Ba Gua Read full review

Contents

The Tao of Ba Gua
1
Internal Power and Internal Martial Arts
5
What Happened to the Ancient Knowledge of Internal Energy?
21
Checking for Unconscious Participation
28
The Arcane Mysterious and Symbolic in Ba Gua Zhang
31
YinYang and Chinese Cosmology
37
The Ba Gua body
41
Mental Emotional and Spiritual Principles
44
TwoMan Drill Number 3
93
Ba Gua Applications for SelfDefense
101
Defense from rear push
102
Response to a Boxers Left Jab
104
Defense from A Rear Leg Roundhouse Kick
108
Unarmed Defender Against Knife Attack
112
Solution for Left Cross Body Hook
116
In Conclusion
121

The Four Precious Methods
48
Ba Gua Qi Gong
57
Five Methods Eight Gates
63
Ba Gua TwoMan Application Drills
79
TwoMan Drill Number I
81
TwoMan Drill Number 2
86
Notes
123
Bibliography
131
Index
135
About the Authors
139
Copyright

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About the author (1998)

Liu Xing-Han, of Beijing, China, is the last of the fourth-generation Ba Gua disciples. He began his martial arts studies in 1917. In 1996 he was the subject of a China National Television documentary commemorating his life's work, and has been written about in Chinese magazines, martial art journals, and newspapers. In the United States several issues of Pa Kua Journal, including its debut edition, covered his work. He is the author of three books on Ba Gua in China. He continues to teach the internal tradition.

John Bracy became a fifth-generation lineaged disciple of Ba Gua Zhang in 1988. He founded the Hsing Chen School of Internal Martial Arts in Costa Mesa, California in 1976 and has continued as a director since it incorporated in 1990/ He has studied at advanced levels in the United States, Taiwan, mainland China and has attained advanced rankings and honors in several styles of traditional kung fu. As a graduate exchange student in Taiwan, he researched psychotheraputic applications of acupuncture.

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