Back Stories: U.S. News Production and Palestinian Politics

Front Cover
Stanford University Press, Jan 9, 2013 - History - 352 pages
0 Reviews
Few topics in the news are more hotly contested than the Israeli-Palestinian conflict—and news coverage itself is always a subject of debate. But rarely do these debates incorporate an on-the-ground perspective of what and who newsmaking entails. Studying how journalists work in Jerusalem, Bethlehem, Ramallah, and Nablus, and on the tense roads that connect these cities, Amahl Bishara demonstrates how the production of U.S. news about Palestinians depends on multifaceted collaborations, typically invisible to Western readers. She focuses on the work that Palestinian journalists do behind the scenes and below the bylines—as fixers, photojournalists, camerapeople, reporters, and producers—to provide the news that Americans read, see, and hear every day.

Ultimately, this book demonstrates how Palestinians play integral roles in producing U.S. news and how U.S. journalism in turn shapes Palestinian politics. U.S. objectivity is in Palestinian journalists' hands, and Palestinian self-determination cannot be fully understood without attention to the journalist standing off to the side, quietly taking notes. Back Stories examines news stories big and small—Yassir Arafat's funeral, female suicide bombers, protests against the separation barrier, an all-but-unnoticed killing of a mentally disabled man—to investigate urgent questions about objectivity, violence, the state, and the production of knowledge in today's news. This book reaches beyond the headlines into the lives of Palestinians during the second intifada to give readers a new vantage point on both Palestinians and journalism.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Introduction
1
Does a Checkpoint Have Two Sides?
29
1 Balanced Objectivity and Accumulated Authorship
34
Words That Fly in the Air
68
2 Arming State Speech Constraining Journalists Work
73
An Innocent Evening Out? Representing Cultural Life and Resistance
102
Disinterest and the Scope of the Political
106
A Reliable Source? Prison Bars as Sound Barrier
131
5 The Separation Wall as Stage for Refugee Identities
167
Parsing Chaos
197
6 Watching US Television from the Palestinian Street
202
A Discerning Representation of More Than Two Sides
229
Voice Materiality and Violence
233
Notes
259
Works Cited
291
Index
315

4 The Embodied and UpClose Work of Journalism
136
Locating the Foreign Correspondent at a Demonstration
162

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2013)

Amahl A. Bishara is Assistant Professor of Anthropology at Tufts University. She filmed the documentary Across Oceans, Among Colleagues (2002), which follows the advocacy efforts of the New York–based Committee to Protect Journalists on behalf of journalists in the Middle East.

Bibliographic information