Back to Methuselah a Metabiological Pentateuch

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Kessinger Publishing, Apr 1, 2005 - Drama - 360 pages
1924. Most of Shaw's early plays were either banned by the censor or refused production. With Plays: Pleasant and Unpleasant he sought a reading audience. He also began the practice of writing the challenging, mocking, eloquent prefaces to his plays, which were sometimes longer than the play itself. He won the Nobel prize in 1925. Back to Methuselah is one of his later and well-regarded works. See other titles by this author available from Kessinger Publishing.

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User Review  - NaggedMan - LibraryThing

One aspect of this edition is typical Shaw. Asked to choose something to be the 500th volume in "The World's Classics" series, he chose this play but added a 'preface' of no less than 283 pages ... Read full review

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User Review  - David.Alfred.Sarkies - LibraryThing

This play is my favourite Bernard Shaw play next to Pygmalion, and having been written in the early twenties, it not only shows some more maturity in the playwriting, but also explores a topic that ... Read full review

About the author (2005)

Renowned literary genius George Bernard Shaw was born on July 26, 1856 in Dublin, Ireland. He later moved to London and educated himself at the British Museum while several of his novels were published in small socialist magazines. Shaw later became a music critic for the Star and for the World. He was a drama critic for the Saturday Review and later began to have some of his early plays produced. Shaw wrote the plays Man and Superman, Major Barbara, and Pygmalion, which was later adapted as My Fair Lady in both the musical and film form. He also transformed his works into screenplays for Saint Joan, How He Lied to Her Husband, Arms and the Man, Pygmalion, and Major Barbara. Shaw won the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1925. George Bernard Shaw died on November 2, 1950 at Ayot St. Lawrence, Hertfordshire, England.

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