Backgrounds to David Jones: A Study in Sources and Drafts

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University of Wales Press, Jan 1, 1990 - Literary Criticism - 232 pages
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This is the first book to make extensive use of David Jones's drafts of poems and essays, his letters, and his own annotations to the books in his library. It takes into account all Jones's published poetry and offers a thematic treatment of his ideas and work. This book considers the philosophical and intellectual backgrounds and the historical sources that lie behind David Jones's poetry.   By consulting the texts that Jones drew on either directly or indirectly in the creation of his poetry, the author has attempted to prepare the ground for a sympathetic understanding of all Jones's work. The present volume makes extensive use of the books which Jones possessed and annotated. It also considers a large number of unpublished drafts and letters and includes a long passage from In Parenthesis that was eventually deleted by the poet. The book discusses all Jones's published work and considers the major themes and preoccupations that absorbed him.

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Contents

Eric Gill
23
Oswald Spengler
36
History Myth and the Form of the Writing
65
Copyright

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About the author (1990)

Jonathan Miles left home at seventeen, intent on a life in music, but when he landed in Oxford, Mississippi, he traded in the blues for writing. Having learned the art of fiction and of living from Barry Hannah and the late Larry Brown, Miles has worked as a blues researcher, bartender, gardener, and journalist, covering everything from the death of Faulkner's bootlegger to the theory and practice of bar fights to the Dakar Rally in Africa. Now the cocktails columnist for the New York Times and books columnist for Men's Journal, Miles's work has appeared, among other places, in GQ, the Oxford American, the New York Observer, and the New York Times Book Review.

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