Backstory: Inside the Business of News

Front Cover
Penguin, Dec 28, 2004 - Business & Economics - 320 pages
1 Review
It is said that journalism is a vital public service as well as a business, but more and more it is also said that big media consolidation; noisy, instant opinions on cable and the Internet; and political “bias” are making a mockery of such high-minded ideals. In Backstory, Ken Auletta explores why one of America’s most important industries is also among its most troubled. He travels from the proud New York Times, the last outpost of old-school family ownership, whose own personnel problems make headline news, into the depths of New York City’s brutal tabloid wars and out across the country to journalism’s new wave, chains like the Chicago Tribune’s, where “synergy” is ever more a mantra. He probes the moral ambiguity of “media personalities”—journalists who become celebrities themselves, padding their incomes by schmoozing with Imus and rounding the lucrative corporate lecture circuit. He reckons with the legacy of journalism’s past and the different prospects for its future, from fallen stars of new media such as Inside.com to the rising star of cable news, Roger Ailes’s Fox News. The product of more than ten years covering the news media for The New Yorker, Backstory is Journalism 101 by the course’s master teacher.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

BACKSTORY: Inside the Business of News

User Review  - Jane Doe - Kirkus

Protestations by Fox News and the White House notwithstanding, the "liberal media" is a fiction. And what's killing the news business, writes New Yorker media critic Auletta (Three Blind Mice, 1991 ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - carterchristian1 - LibraryThing

The Amazon reviewer gave mixed opinions of this book. It IS a compilation over a number of years from the author's New Yorker articles on journalism (which continue)and some reviewers believed the ... Read full review

Contents

A WEEK IN SEPTEMBER
THE AGENDA
THE ALABAMAN
CHOOSING JOURNALISM
THE COMPETITION
COURSE CORRECTIONS
THE CELEBRATION
HISTORY
KOSNER VS ALLAN
IS THIS CAPITALISM?
THE FUTURE
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2004)

Ken Auletta has written the “Annals of Communications” column and profiles for The New Yorker since 1992. He is the author of eight books, including Three Blind Mice, Greed and Glory on Wall Street, and World War 3.0. In naming him America’s premier media critic, the Columbia Journalism Review said, “No other reporter has covered the new communications revolution as thoroughly as has Auletta.” He lives in Manhattan with his wife and daughter.

Bibliographic information